The CIA warned South Africa for the Guptas in 2009



American intelligence services were alerted in 2009 to the activities of Gupta within the government of South Africa, according to a report in the Sunday Times.

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) reportedly warned South African intelligence services of the controversial family's operations, prompting an investigation into Gupta's involvement in conquering the state.

Former spies bosses Gibson Njenje and Moe Shaik told the Sunday Times that they had talked several times with former President Jacob Zuma to warn him of the dangers of the Gupta family, but Zuma did not pay attention to their warnings.

Njenje said that the American intelligence services were aware of the activities of the Gupta family because of their uranium mining activities.

"The Americans wanted to know why the Guptas are interested in winning uranium and where they plan to ship their product," Njenje said.

"Of course we were also interested."

Research

The local investigation prompted by the interest of the CIA for the family led to the release of both intelligence officers from their posts, according to the report.

Njenje said that in 2010 the Guptas began directly to interfere with government operations and exploit their ties with the president.

"From the point of view of state security we tried to find out – why this guts?" Said Njenje.

"They made an open show that they have a relationship with the president."

The study showed that Zuma visited the Gupta compound at Saxonwold at least once a week and would eat there every Monday.

Shaik added that repeated attempts to meet Zuma about his involvement with the Guptas were useless and unproductive.

"The president gave us a story about Duduzane and Duduzile and the Guptas we never really understood," said Shaik.

"It was clear that he was not going to do anything, he said the Guptas were the only people who wanted to help his son."

South African prosecutors still pursue the Gupta family for state-owned activities, and warrants have been issued for both Atul and Tony Gupta.

Prosecutors are also trying to cooperate with the government of the United Arab Emirates to block so-called stolen funds that have moved to Dubai from South Africa.

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