Thousands of human teeth are discovered under the CBD of Melbourne



A thousand human teeth have been discovered under the surface of Melbourne's CBD during a major archaeological excavation.

More than half a million art objects have already been excavated as part of the Metro Tunnel Project worth 11 billion dollars, but this is the most bizarre discovery so far.

The excavations take place at two historically important locations in Melbourne, near the corner of the streets Flinders and Swanston and the corner of the streets La Trobe and Swanston.

Teeth from the 1900s were discovered during construction work on the subway tunnel.
Teeth from the 1900s were discovered during construction work on the subway tunnel. (Delivered)

The excavation occurs on the construction of the new underground city hall and the stations of the state library.

It is thought that the human teeth were probably left by a dentist and surgeon who used to work in the same location on Swanston Street, right next to the Young and Jackson pub.

"I love to go back to the roots of what the city is built around," said archaeologist Jen Porter.

The teeth were probably removed by a dentist who opened a shop in 1898.
The teeth were probably removed by a dentist who opened a shop in 1898. (Nine)

Many of the teeth showed a clear sign of decay, often with root exposure. Experts said that this means that patients would have suffered excruciating pain before their teeth were removed.

Most teeth were from adults, some with visible spots on it, possibly tobacco or betel nut.

It is assumed that the dentist probably removed teeth at that time instead of repairing them in this practice.

The dentist had his office on Swanston Street 11, next to where the Young and Jackson pub now stands.
The dentist had his office on Swanston Street 11, next to where the Young and Jackson pub now stands. (Delivered)

"We think he was not so good at throwing away teeth in a hygienic way," said excavation director Megan Goulding.

& # 39; He probably flushed them through toilets or the basin. & # 39;

The teeth were found throughout the building and from the inside an iron drain pipe, which means that they were probably washed away by a drain or were thrown away with the garbage or in the garden.

Earring and at least 20 dice were found on 13 Swanston Street, where a hotel used to operate.
Earring and at least 20 dice were found on 13 Swanston Street, where a hotel used to operate. (Nine)

The dentist who owned the store, JJ Forester, opened the office in 1898.

Meanwhile, various objects for games and gambling from the years 1720-1800 were found underground in the adjacent building.

At least 20 dice were recovered in 13 Swanston Street, a piece of land previously occupied by a hotel.

The excavations take place at two historically important locations in Melbourne.
The excavations take place at two historically important locations in Melbourne. (Delivered)
Archaeologists expect to expose more than a million artefacts while continuing to filter through different layers of underground filling.
Archaeologists expect to expose more than a million artefacts while continuing to filter through different layers of underground filling. (Delivered)
Bird's eye view of Melbourne in 1874.
Bird's eye view of Melbourne in 1874. (Included)

The dice were mainly from bovine bone or ivory.

Earrings, probably from 1860 to 1890, were also discovered during the excavation. Experts revealed that they had probably been dropped off by a "well-to-do" lady who was walking around the hotel and possibly a gift from a foreign lover.

The earrings probably fall through the floor plate, discovered 150 years later.

The public can view the items soon, with a collection of artifacts that can be seen in the project's special visitors center in September.
The public can view the items soon, with a collection of artifacts that can be seen in the project's special visitors center in September.

(Delivered)

Viewing windows at both excavation locations is designed so that the public can view the process.

A second window looking at the southern CBD site was recently installed on Swanston Street, while another vantage point was also created in Scott Alley, at Flinders Lane.

Archaeologists expect to discover more than a million artefacts while continuing to filter through different layers of underground fillings, each containing remnants of different epochs from Melbourne's history.

The public can view the items soon, with a collection of artifacts that can be seen in the project's special visitors center in September.

© Nine Digital Pty Ltd 2018


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