Six months of no sex for Meghan & Harry – Health



Was that a wise decision? Pregnant Duchess Meghan von Sussex will visit the Fiji and Tonga Islands next to Australia with husband Prince Harry in the coming days. Despite the prevailing Zika virus warning.

No vaccine against this infection has been transmitted by the yellow fever mosquito.

Reportedly, the ducal couple was sufficiently aware of the risks and required appropriate measures before commencing his 16-day trip abroad.

Malformations in the fetus

An infection with the Zika virus during pregnancy can, according to Univ. Prof. dr. Dr. Med. Heinrich Stemberger from the Vienna Institute of Travel and Tropical Medicine is most likely transferred to the fetus – even if there are no symptoms in the expectant mother. As a result, malformations of the brain and damage to the central nervous system of the unborn child can occur.

Weren and Permethrin

The only way to protect yourself from the virus is to avoid "sticking", the doctor says.

This is especially the case with insect repellents, which can be used safely according to Stemberger, even during pregnancy. With the insect repellent you have to rub every four to six hours. Women should also use repellents more often than men because they produce certain pheromones that attract mosquitoes.

In addition, the clothing must be impregnated with permethrin prior to travel, the expert recommends.

The danger is not prohibited after the trip

Because only very few people infected (about one in five people) also have symptoms, the disease can often go unnoticed. To be sure after the return, according to Univ. Prof. dr. Dr. Med. Heinrich Stemberger on the one hand a serological Zika virus test for the determination of the antibodies and on the other a BCR-ABL-proof with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Only if both tests are negative, an infection can be excluded.

No sex for six months

Because the Zika virus can also be transmitted sexually, there can be no sex for Duchess Meghan in the case of a Prince Harry infection for six months. As long as the virus can be eliminated with the sperm.

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(Christine Scharfetter)


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