Researchers confirm the surface ice at the poles of the moon




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At the darkest and oldest places of the moon pool area is located Water ice; & # 10 on the surface, as reported by phys.org, the ice depots make a patch of patches and I'm probably already very old. at the S & # 252; Dpol of the moon, most of the ice is found in craters, and at the North Pole the ice is less concentrated over a larger area.

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Water for astronauts

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American researchers have that & # 10; surface & # 228; cheneis by analyzing data from the & # 34; Moon Mineralogy Mapper & # 34; (M3) the NASA found it. This instrument was placed in a lunar orbit on board the Indian spacecraft Chandrayaan-1 in 2008. Measurements of the reflection of light on the surface and the absorption profile in the infrared range have made it possible for the first time evidence for surface water ice on the moon.

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A large part of the ice is in craters, in which no sunlight penetrates. Previous measurements have already suggested the existence of ice, but can also be explained by other peculiarities of the lunar surface. The M3 measurement now offers the direct evidenceIf it appears that the upper layers of the moon contain sufficient ice to a depth of a few millimeters, it can be an interesting source of water for space travel. The researchers want to continue their research. The results were published in PNAS,

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In the darkest and coldest places of the moon pool area is located
water ice
on the surface, as reported by phys.org. the ice depots make a patch of patches and I'm probably already very old. at the South pole In the moon, most ice is found in craters and at the North Pole the ice is less concentrated over a larger area.

Water for astronauts

American researchers have that
surface ice
by analyzing data from the "Moon Mineralogy Mapper" (M3) of the NASA found it. This instrument was placed in a lunar orbit on the Indian spacecraft Chandrayaan-1 in 2008. By measuring the reflection of light on the surface and the absorption profile in the infrared range, a direct now for the first time evidence for surface water ice on the moon.

Much of the ice is located in craters where no sunlight penetrates. Previous measurements have already suggested the existence of ice, but could be explained by other peculiarities of the lunar surface. The M3 measurement now offers the direct evidenceIf it turns out that the top layers of the moon contain sufficient ice to a depth of a few millimeters, that could be an interesting source of water for space travel. The researchers want to continue their research. The results are published in PNAS.


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