Andrew Scheer makes the pitch for unity after the dramatic departure of Bernier



In an important speech for deputies at the Conservative Policy Convention in Halifax, Andrew Scheer said he was best positioned to face Justin Trudeau in the next federal elections, even when a former CEO threatened to split the right-wing vote with a rebellious new party.

Scheer, who last year narrowly won the party leadership, said that the conservative movement is united and in motion, achieving important election victories at provincial level.

"We are certainly a big, strong, united, national conservative party and next year we will be a strong, stable national conservative majority government," said Scheer.

While he did not mention Maxime Bernier – who left the party dramatically on Thursday, he called it "intellectually and morally corrupt" while he swore to start his own – Scheer took a barely concealed blow on his former leadership hunter by former progressive leader Peter MacKay. prizes at the top of his speech.

MacKay, who introduced Scheer to the conference audience, mediated ten years ago a merger between his old party and the Canadian Alliance of Stephen Harper, an agreement that led to a lot of election success.

"Peter is someone who puts aside his personal interests for the good of our party – who decided to build up and not break down – and our party is a living proof of his hard work," said Scheer.

Scheer and his caucus colleagues have been trying to discredit Bernier over the past 24 hours by saying that his efforts are an ego-directed vanity project that will undermine conservative electoral fortunes by 2019. They also said that Bernier has been a slacker as a member of parliament since he was lost to the Scheer.

Bernier questioned Scheer's leadership style, which suggests that the conservative party policy is now being driven by the vagaries of polls and focus groups rather than by solid conservative principles.

Scheer hit Friday morning, pointing out his own success in the leadership race – and the party comes from behind each other by the victory in Quebec earlier this year – as proof that he knows how to win.

"We did not win by compromising, we did not win by trying to impress people who would never like us, or by changing who we are or what we believe in. We have won the best way to win: as far as I am concerned, we have earned it, we have worked harder.

The conservative leader Andrew Scheer and his wife, Jill, are on the podium of the conservative national convention in Halifax. Van Scheer is expected to give a speech on Friday afternoon. (Darren Calabrese / Canadian Press)

"Our ideas were better," he said, during a speech interrupted by frequent applause and chants from "Andrew, Andrew."

Scheer also reiterated a common theme of the convention, proud of the success of fundraising from the Conservative party in recent months. In the most recent quarter, the Tories gained almost twice as much money as the liberals, but liberal party officials have said that the conservatives have spent more to actually collect those funds.

While Scheer acknowledged the continuing tension over Bernier's departure, he spent much of his speech in attacking Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberals on their alleged shortcomings on major issues – and denounced the federal government's plan for a national price for carbon.

"The liberal party has finally shown its true colors, I'm talking about the real liberal party." The tax-raising, regulating, observant, failing, debt-increasing, virtuous signaling liberal Canadians are to know and despise.

"Justin Trudeau tries to say that Canada is back, I say the liberals go back to ignoring the rules and abusing the privileges of power," he said.

Identity politics and history

He also recognized the ongoing debate on identity politics in this country, which says that the liberals have blatantly attacked the record of the first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald. Last week the city council in Victoria, B.C. voted to temporarily remove a status of Macdonald for its role in creating the Indian residential school system.

"I think it's a shame that we allow extreme voices in this country to erase our proud legacy.

"Anyway, if we suddenly start to clear our history with the benefit of hindsight, then we better keep going," he continued, before looking at the report of some liberal prime ministers, including William Lyon MacKenzie King, who refused. a safe haven for a ship of Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi Germany, and Wilfrid Laurier.

"The liberal elite donor program of the liberal party of Canada is called the Laurel Club, the liberal Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier … has signed a decision in 1911 to ban black immigrants to Canada, perhaps they want to reconsider it. we are there, "said Scheer before adding" no ".

"You can see how divisive this approach is, how destructive is this for our Canadian identity?

"We can and must celebrate the giants of our history, such as Laurel and King, but we must not allow political correctness to erase what made us who.

"When we look back at our history and our leaders and see only their imperfections, we miss a beautiful story of a big country that has become one of the safest, most free and prosperous in the world," said Scheer.


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Andrew Scheer makes the pitch for unity after the dramatic departure of Bernier



In an important speech for deputies at the Conservative Policy Convention in Halifax, Andrew Scheer said he was best positioned to face Justin Trudeau in the next federal elections, even when a former CEO threatened to split the right-wing vote with a rebellious new party.

Scheer, who last year narrowly won the party leadership, said that the conservative movement is united and in motion, achieving important election victories at provincial level.

"We are certainly a big, strong, united, national conservative party and next year we will be a strong, stable national conservative majority government," said Scheer.

While he did not mention Maxime Bernier – who left the party dramatically on Thursday, he called it "intellectually and morally corrupt" while he swore to start his own – Scheer took a barely concealed blow on his former leadership hunter by former progressive leader Peter MacKay. prizes at the top of his speech.

MacKay, who introduced Scheer to the conference audience, mediated ten years ago a merger between his old party and the Canadian Alliance of Stephen Harper, an agreement that led to a lot of election success.

"Peter is someone who puts aside his personal interests for the good of our party – who decided to build up and not break down – and our party is a living proof of his hard work," said Scheer.

Scheer and his caucus colleagues have been trying to discredit Bernier over the past 24 hours by saying that his efforts are an ego-directed vanity project that will undermine conservative electoral fortunes by 2019. They also said that Bernier has been a slacker as a member of parliament since he was lost to the Scheer.

Bernier questioned Scheer's leadership style, which suggests that the conservative party policy is now being driven by the vagaries of polls and focus groups rather than by solid conservative principles.

Scheer hit Friday morning, pointing out his own success in the leadership race – and the party comes from behind each other by the victory in Quebec earlier this year – as proof that he knows how to win.

"We did not win by compromising, we did not win by trying to impress people who would never like us, or by changing who we are or what we believe in. We have won the best way to win: as far as I am concerned, we have earned it, we have worked harder.

The conservative leader Andrew Scheer and his wife, Jill, are on the podium of the conservative national convention in Halifax. Van Scheer is expected to give a speech on Friday afternoon. (Darren Calabrese / Canadian Press)

"Our ideas were better," he said, during a speech interrupted by frequent applause and chants from "Andrew, Andrew."

Scheer also reiterated a common theme of the convention, proud of the success of fundraising from the Conservative party in recent months. In the most recent quarter, the Tories gained almost twice as much money as the liberals, but liberal party officials have said that the conservatives have spent more to actually collect those funds.

While Scheer acknowledged the continuing tension over Bernier's departure, he spent much of his speech in attacking Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberals on their alleged shortcomings on major issues – and denounced the federal government's plan for a national price for carbon.

"The liberal party has finally shown its true colors, I'm talking about the real liberal party." The tax-raising, regulating, observant, failing, debt-increasing, virtuous signaling liberal Canadians are to know and despise.

"Justin Trudeau tries to say that Canada is back, I say the liberals go back to ignoring the rules and abusing the privileges of power," he said.

Identity politics and history

He also recognized the ongoing debate on identity politics in this country, which says that the liberals have blatantly attacked the record of the first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald. Last week the city council in Victoria, B.C. voted to temporarily remove a status of Macdonald for its role in creating the Indian residential school system.

"I think it's a shame that we allow extreme voices in this country to erase our proud legacy.

"Anyway, if we suddenly start to clear our history with the benefit of hindsight, then we better keep going," he continued, before looking at the report of some liberal prime ministers, including William Lyon MacKenzie King, who refused. a safe haven for a ship of Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi Germany, and Wilfrid Laurier.

"The liberal elite donor program of the liberal party of Canada is called the Laurel Club, the liberal Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier … has signed a decision in 1911 to ban black immigrants to Canada, perhaps they want to reconsider it. we are there, "said Scheer before adding" no ".

"You can see how divisive this approach is, how destructive is this for our Canadian identity?

"We can and must celebrate the giants of our history, such as Laurel and King, but we must not allow political correctness to erase what made us who.

"When we look back at our history and our leaders and see only their imperfections, we miss a beautiful story of a big country that has become one of the safest, most free and prosperous in the world," said Scheer.


Source link

Andrew Scheer makes the pitch for unity after the dramatic departure of Bernier



In an important speech for deputies at the Conservative Policy Convention in Halifax, Andrew Scheer said he was best positioned to face Justin Trudeau in the next federal elections, even when a former CEO threatened to split the right-wing vote with a rebellious new party.

Scheer, who last year narrowly won the party leadership, said that the conservative movement is united and in motion, achieving important election victories at provincial level.

"We are certainly a big, strong, united, national conservative party and next year we will be a strong, stable national conservative majority government," said Scheer.

While he did not mention Maxime Bernier – who left the party dramatically on Thursday, he called it "intellectually and morally corrupt" while he swore to start his own – Scheer took a barely concealed blow on his former leadership hunter by former progressive leader Peter MacKay. prizes at the top of his speech.

MacKay, who introduced Scheer to the conference audience, mediated ten years ago a merger between his old party and the Canadian Alliance of Stephen Harper, an agreement that led to a lot of election success.

"Peter is someone who puts aside his personal interests for the good of our party – who decided to build up and not break down – and our party is a living proof of his hard work," said Scheer.

Scheer and his caucus colleagues have been trying to discredit Bernier over the past 24 hours by saying that his efforts are an ego-directed vanity project that will undermine conservative electoral fortunes by 2019. They also said that Bernier has been a slacker as a member of parliament since he was lost to the Scheer.

Bernier questioned Scheer's leadership style, which suggests that the conservative party policy is now being driven by the vagaries of polls and focus groups rather than by solid conservative principles.

Scheer hit Friday morning, pointing out his own success in the leadership race – and the party comes from behind each other by the victory in Quebec earlier this year – as proof that he knows how to win.

"We did not win by compromising, we did not win by trying to impress people who would never like us, or by changing who we are or what we believe in. We have won the best way to win: as far as I am concerned, we have earned it, we have worked harder.

The conservative leader Andrew Scheer and his wife, Jill, are on the podium of the conservative national convention in Halifax. Van Scheer is expected to give a speech on Friday afternoon. (Darren Calabrese / Canadian Press)

"Our ideas were better," he said, during a speech interrupted by frequent applause and chants from "Andrew, Andrew."

Scheer also reiterated a common theme of the convention, proud of the success of fundraising from the Conservative party in recent months. In the most recent quarter, the Tories gained almost twice as much money as the liberals, but liberal party officials have said that the conservatives have spent more to actually collect those funds.

While Scheer acknowledged the continuing tension over Bernier's departure, he spent much of his speech in attacking Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberals on their alleged shortcomings on major issues – and denounced the federal government's plan for a national price for carbon.

"The liberal party has finally shown its true colors, I'm talking about the real liberal party." The tax-raising, regulating, observant, failing, debt-increasing, virtuous signaling liberal Canadians are to know and despise.

"Justin Trudeau tries to say that Canada is back, I say the liberals go back to ignoring the rules and abusing the privileges of power," he said.

Identity politics and history

He also recognized the ongoing debate on identity politics in this country, which says that the liberals have blatantly attacked the record of the first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald. Last week the city council in Victoria, B.C. voted to temporarily remove a status of Macdonald for its role in creating the Indian residential school system.

"I think it's a shame that we allow extreme voices in this country to erase our proud legacy.

"Anyway, if we suddenly start to clear our history with the benefit of hindsight, then we better keep going," he continued, before looking at the report of some liberal prime ministers, including William Lyon MacKenzie King, who refused. a safe haven for a ship of Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi Germany, and Wilfrid Laurier.

"The liberal elite donor program of the liberal party of Canada is called the Laurel Club, the liberal Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier … has signed a decision in 1911 to ban black immigrants to Canada, perhaps they want to reconsider it. we are there, "said Scheer before adding" no ".

"You can see how divisive this approach is, how destructive is this for our Canadian identity?

"We can and must celebrate the giants of our history, such as Laurel and King, but we must not allow political correctness to erase what made us who.

"When we look back at our history and our leaders and see only their imperfections, we miss a beautiful story of a big country that has become one of the safest, most free and prosperous in the world," said Scheer.


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