European windleatellite Aeolus taking off from French Guiana tomorrow – the Aeolus satellite from ESA



ESE & # 39; s Aeolus satellite

ESE & # 39; s Aeolus satellite

The European Space Agency (ESA) is ready to launch its wind-sensitive satellite Aeolus – a name derived from Greek mythology – from French Guiana tomorrow. Here is everything you need to know about the space expedition and what it aims to achieve.

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Real-time tracking of wind

Real-time tracking of wind

Built by Airbus, Aeolus will be the first satellite equipped to carry out worldwide wind-component profile perception in near real time.

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How the satellite works?

How the satellite works?

The Vega rocket with the Aeolus satellite will also be known aboard a Doppler wind lidar as Aladin, which is one of the most sensitive instruments ever to be orbited around the earth. Aladin will make Aeolus the first satellite to measure wind speeds on Earth directly from space, with crucial data that is expected to greatly improve weather forecasts around the world. The wind-sensitive satellite of the European Space Agency

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Last step for a big jump

Last step for a big jump

The teams responsible for flying the Aeolus satellite have a pre-launch & # 39; dress rehearsal & # 39; completed at the ESOC ESOC operation center in Darmstadt. This was the last big step before the final launch.

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In the control room

In the control room

Experts in mission operations, flight dynamics, ground stations and software systems worked together with counterparts in the Jupiter Control Room on the other side of the Atlantic in the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana, to practice the pre-launch and lancoff series.

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Send signals from space

Send signals from space

The Vega rocket launcher will inject Aeolus into orbit around the earth at an altitude of 320 km. As soon as the satellite separates from the rocket and begins free flight, the solar panels have expanded and Aeolus has turned to Earth, a worldwide network of ground stations will begin receiving signals from the satellite, making the first data link between Aeolus and mission control indicated.

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The LEOP period

The LEOP period

After making contact, teams start three days of intense activity, working around the clock to guide the satellite through the LEOP period – the & l; launch and early runway & # 39; – one of the most critical periods in the life of every satellite. By working non-stop to verify the health of the satellite, they will enable and configure the flight control systems and ensure that all critical steps take place as planned, and that all flight control systems and communications work as planned.

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