They capture by their hands a pedophile who is hospitalized rape of a minor of 2 years



It was a Saturday morning when a woman called the Greater Manchester Police in 1945 to say that she had found indecent images of a child younger than two years on her friend's computer

The police officer, Colin Larkin, heard the call and told the BBC that he felt the hair rise in his neck.

" For the person who answered the call it was clear that that woman had seen something that nobody had ever seen " says Larkin.

The woman visited the police station Cheadle Heath and her friend was called her. She told him she was going home soon, and the detectives volunteered to catch him.

The man, identified as Jeremy Oketch 34 years old, was arrested on July 19, 2014. He was completely unsuspecting and scared by the presence of the police in his house.

"Clearly he did not know what we knew," said Officer Larkin.

  Colin Larkin

BBC
"In 27 years of police work, these are the worst images I have seen," police officer Colin Larkin said.

"Seeing photos & # 39; s [del video] was terrible, but told the father that his daughter, loved and wanted, was raped, is one of the worst things I had to do "says agent Larkin.

Larkin says he was sure that Oketch was the one who appeared in the video the minor, but there was a serious problem: his face was hidden in the images and did not have enough evidence to guarantee a conviction.

The interrogation

– Are you in those videos?

– No comments.

– Where did these incidents occur?

-Sin

– Can I look at his hands right now?

– No comments.

In the reviews of Jeremy Oketch, the researchers were impressed by his cold and emotionless attitude. "I was just sitting there, almost bored" remembers agent Larkin.

However, in the light of the man's refusal and not with clear evidence to accuse him, the researchers had an ace in store. They could not see the face of the aggressor of the video, but they could compare their hands with those of the man questioned and see if it was the same subject.

So agent Larkin went to Professor Sue Black, an anthropologist at the Center for Human Anatomy at the University of Dundee, expert in identifying anatomical features, including hands.

  Professor Sue Black

BBC
Professor Sue Black, Human Anatomy Center at the University of Dundee, states that the knuckles and vein patterns are individual for each person.

The signs that Jeremy Oketch accused

"If you want to steal a ban, you do not take away the fact that you're stealing the bank … If you're going to kill somebody, do not you say you killed him. you abuse a minor, you film yourself to commit that abuse, and part of it is to relive the excitement of the images for the aggressor, "says Professor Black.

She creates an algorithm that is connected to a database with hand images all over the world, because the process takes place today. It is manual. " Never found two matching hands even in identical twins," he says.

"All comparisons are made with a view to the difference in comparison, such as that game we played as children, I have this image and I have it, what is normal and what is different?", Says Professor Black.

It is the task to identify scars, skin color patterns or superficial veins. Professor Black says that during the trial you are fighting " against yourself to see yourself unaffected and say & # 39; yes, it is he, he is & # 39; .

" You can not do that. You are practically looking for something that says & # 39; he is not & # 39 ;. "

  Jeremy Oketch's Hands

BBC
The aggressor of the video since the accused in this case finally ended the same: Jeremy Oketch. He succeeded in being accused to become by characteristic signs of his hands.

In this case, Professor Black took pictures of the aggressor's hands from the video of the rape and compared it with photos of the defendant's hands.

In this way he could see that there were common features in both images, such as a vein of dark brown pigment along the nails and a line with a somewhat red color on the ring finger.

In summary, aggressor and ] Defendant were the same person: Jeremy Oketch.

"It was great. That was beyond my expectations. She proved, beyond all reasonable doubts, that he was guilty, "says Officer Larkin.

" In 27 years of police work these have been the worst images I have seen. "

On March 12, 2015, Oketch was sentenced to 15 years in prison.


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