"Carbon space" for development is to replace RES and electric cars



India has very ambitious goals for the development of solar power plants. The Indian Minister of Energy has also heard that by 2030 only electric vehicles will drive on Indian roads. Yet India still produces about 70% of its electricity in coal-fired plants. The population of India is so high that the development of local energy has great potential to influence other countries, especially with regard to emissions of emissions.

India was in the past a country that often claimed that it needed "carbon space for its development". At present, however, they are increasingly inclined to cleaner economic development. On the one hand there is the health and comfort of the Indian population, and on the other hand there are estimates of CO emissions2 India in the future – as one of the highest in the world. Bloomberg's economic analysis of the New Energy Outlook 2018 predicts the peak in India's emissions in 2033 and will be 29% higher than today. In 2050, however, they should be 22% lower than in 2017.

Emissions from the electricity sector in India between 2012 and 2050. Source: Bloomberg NEO 2018

More and more people in India are starting to worry about emissions in inhabited areas. In 2015, the rules for emissions in power plants would be met in December 2017. However, this period was later shifted to 2022. Part of this shift is interpreted as India's lack of interest in power plant emissions. India currently extracts more than 70% of its electricity from coal.

In India, the so-called National Clean Air program is being prepared to monitor and manage air pollution. The subject of the plan is to improve the infrastructure, more allocation of human power, decentralization of the fight against pollution, that is, focus on, for example, individual cities and others.

Only electric cars in 2030?

In 2017, the Minister of Energy announced that India will only have electric cars by 2030. However, this statement has been answered with reality and has not yet been translated into an official government policy.

On the roads of India, however, many electric trikes are used in public transport. Many electric buses have also been ordered for the same needs. The local government in Delhi plans to buy 1,000 electric buses and by March 2019 it is all on the street.

The use of electric cars in passenger transport does not grow too far. The government focuses on and supports the electrification of public transport. As long as electric cars do not reach the same prices as a combustion engine expected in the 20th century, it is unlikely that their use will increase.

Illustration photo.

Clean energy as a means for economic development

In the field of solar energy, India plans to realize 100 GW of installed capacity. In July 2018 the country crossed the imaginary limit of 23 GW, with another 10 GW currently being installed and another 24 GW tenders were announced.

According to NEO 2018, India has the most installed capacity of solar power plants in the world – by 2050 almost 1,000 GW. Since the middle of the 20th century, Bloomberg has been predicting a decline in the share of coal in the Indian electricity mix, up to 14% in 2050.

Nowadays, India no longer speaks about the need to develop "carbon space". The government realized that haze in the air, especially in winter, discouraged labor and capital. There is a time when air quality in Indian cities is worse than in Chinese. The performance of the Chinese economy is much higher.


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"Carbon space" for development is to replace RES and electric cars



India has very ambitious goals for the development of solar power plants. The Indian Minister of Energy has also heard that by 2030 only electric vehicles will drive on Indian roads. Yet India still produces about 70% of its electricity in coal-fired plants. The population of India is so high that the development of local energy has great potential to influence other countries, especially with regard to emissions of emissions.

India was in the past a country that often claimed that it needed "carbon space for its development". At present, however, they are increasingly inclined to cleaner economic development. On the one hand there is the health and comfort of the Indian population, and on the other hand there are estimates of CO emissions2 India in the future – as one of the highest in the world. Bloomberg's economic analysis of the New Energy Outlook 2018 predicts the peak in India's emissions in 2033 and will be 29% higher than today. In 2050, however, they should be 22% lower than in 2017.

Emissions from the electricity sector in India between 2012 and 2050. Source: Bloomberg NEO 2018

More and more people in India are starting to worry about emissions in inhabited areas. In 2015, the rules for emissions in power plants would be met in December 2017. However, this period was later shifted to 2022. Part of this shift is interpreted as India's lack of interest in power plant emissions. India currently extracts more than 70% of its electricity from coal.

In India, the so-called National Clean Air program is being prepared to monitor and manage air pollution. The subject of the plan is to improve the infrastructure, more allocation of human power, decentralization of the fight against pollution, that is, focus on, for example, individual cities and others.

Only electric cars in 2030?

In 2017, the Minister of Energy announced that India will only have electric cars by 2030. However, this statement has been answered with reality and has not yet been translated into an official government policy.

On the roads of India, however, many electric trikes are used in public transport. Many electric buses have also been ordered for the same needs. The local government in Delhi plans to buy 1,000 electric buses and by March 2019 it is all on the street.

The use of electric cars in passenger transport does not grow too far. The government focuses on and supports the electrification of public transport. As long as electric cars do not reach the same prices as a combustion engine expected in the 20th century, it is unlikely that their use will increase.

Illustration photo.

Clean energy as a means for economic development

In the field of solar energy, India plans to realize 100 GW of installed capacity. In July 2018 the country crossed the imaginary limit of 23 GW, with another 10 GW currently being installed and another 24 GW tenders were announced.

According to NEO 2018, India has the most installed capacity of solar power plants in the world – by 2050 almost 1,000 GW. Since the middle of the 20th century, Bloomberg has been predicting a decline in the share of coal in the Indian electricity mix, up to 14% in 2050.

Nowadays, India no longer speaks about the need to develop "carbon space". The government realized that haze in the air, especially in winter, discouraged labor and capital. There is a time when air quality in Indian cities is worse than in Chinese. The performance of the Chinese economy is much higher.


Source link

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