Equinor considers a floating wind farm for oil fields



The Norwegian company Equinor, formerly known as Statoil, is considering the construction of a wind turbine offshore wind turbine. / Illustration photo

The Norwegian company Equinor, formerly known as Statoil, is considering the construction of a wind turbine offshore wind turbine. / Illustration photo

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The Norwegian company Equinor, formerly known as Statoil, is considering the construction of a wind turbine offshore wind turbine. It would supply electricity to its Gullfaks and Snorre oil fields in the North Sea. If the plan has to be implemented, it will be the first floating wind farm to supply electricity to oil platforms. The cost of its construction must be estimated at five billion Norwegian kroner (13,2 billion CZK). The plant could reduce CO2 emissions by more than 200,000 tons per year, according to the company.

"In order to keep our activities (at sea in Norway) profitable for a long time, it is essential that we do everything possible to further reduce our company's carbon footprint," says Arne Executive Vice President, Sigve Nylund.

Equinor has changed the name of the original Statoil this year to better emphasize the transition to renewable energy. For the next decade, oil and gas remain the dominant activities of the company.

The first floating wind farm, Equinor, started operations outside of Scotland last year. It supplies electricity to the coast. Equinor also plans to have anchored offshore wind power plants in the US, Poland and Great Britain.

The final decision on the Snorre and Gullfaks oilfield power plant should drop next year. First, however, the company wants to try to reduce the costs of its development. The plant should have a total of 11 turbines, each with a capacity of eight megawatts. This would mean that the demand for electricity in both fields would be achieved by 35 percent.

In addition to Equinor, the Gullfaks oilfield also owns the Austrian OMV and the Norwegian citizen Petoro. The Snorre field is the owner of Equinor, Petoro, ExxonMobil, Idemitsu, DEA and Point Resources, Reuters said.



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Equinor considers a floating wind farm for oil fields



The Norwegian company Equinor, formerly known as Statoil, is considering the construction of a wind turbine offshore wind turbine. / Illustration photo

The Norwegian company Equinor, formerly known as Statoil, is considering the construction of a wind turbine offshore wind turbine. / Illustration photo

License All rights reserved. Further distribution is only possible with permission of the author

The Norwegian company Equinor, formerly known as Statoil, is considering the construction of a wind turbine offshore wind turbine. It would supply electricity to its Gullfaks and Snorre oil fields in the North Sea. If the plan has to be implemented, it will be the first floating wind farm to supply electricity to oil platforms. The cost of its construction must be estimated at five billion Norwegian kroner (13,2 billion CZK). The plant could reduce CO2 emissions by more than 200,000 tons per year, according to the company.

"In order to keep our activities (at sea in Norway) profitable for a long time, it is essential that we do everything possible to further reduce our company's carbon footprint," says Arne Executive Vice President, Sigve Nylund.

Equinor has changed the name of the original Statoil this year to better emphasize the transition to renewable energy. For the next decade, oil and gas remain the dominant activities of the company.

The first floating wind farm, Equinor, started operations outside of Scotland last year. It supplies electricity to the coast. Equinor also plans to have anchored offshore wind power plants in the US, Poland and Great Britain.

The final decision on the Snorre and Gullfaks oilfield power plant should drop next year. First, however, the company wants to try to reduce the costs of its development. The plant should have a total of 11 turbines, each with a capacity of eight megawatts. This would mean that the demand for electricity in both fields would be achieved by 35 percent.

Besides Equinor, the Gullfaks oilfield also owns the Austrian OMV and the Norwegian state-owned Petoro. The Snorre field is the owner of Equinor, Petoro, ExxonMobil, Idemitsu, DEA and Point Resources, Reuters said.



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