Clément Méric, the discreet student who "did not look down"



Paris – At the age of 18, hit by skinheads in Paris in June 2013, Clément Méric was a brilliant and extreme left student since adolescence, as discrete as he was determined in his fight against racism or for the animal purpose.

"Clement, it's someone who refused to look down. And he did not let them down that dayOn June 5, 2013, Clément Méric & # 39; s slender and slender figure on the tarmac collapsed in a fight between young anti-fascists and right-wing activists in the center of Paris. In a deep coma he dies the next day. .

Son of two professors, Clément Méric spent a happy childhood in Brest. In the beginning, his interests – history, politics, observation of society – placed him on the path of political involvement.

In 2010, at the age of 15, he read Karl Marx and manifested himself against the reform plans of the school. He then comes closer to anarchists and anti-fascist circles, through politics and music – he plays guitar and listens to reggae, rock, punk.

All very grateful, his family members and former teachers call a boy "thoughtful"And"bright"sometimes too"playful"And"ironic""He was curious"And"would always have defended the widow and the orphan"according to one of his aunts.

In 2011 he received leukemia and spent six weeks in a sterile room. A test that does not deviate from its libertarian obligations, but also antispecies (against the exploitation of animals and their consumption by people). His doctors will have the greatest difficulty convincing him to diversify his diet so as not to weaken him. "He had accepted"But"as soon as he was better"He became vegetarian again," one of them remembers.

He is then in the first, revised in the hospital, reads enormously. The disease weakens it, but also makes it mature according to its family members. He gets 19/20 from the French bac.

– "Never combative"-

In the fall of 2012, with a high honors degree, he went to Sciences-Po Paris. He hesitates between journalism, justice, education and research.

He rents a studio in the 9th arrondissement and quickly befriends one of his neighbors, Alain Rivarol. In this "build where almost no one speaks"The young man spontaneously came to introduce himself by crossing him on the stairs." Clément, he said, "was a sunbeam in the building".

In Ménilmontant, the favorite district of Parisian anti-fascists, Clément Méric started to campaign in the Action Anti-Fascist Parisian suburbs (AFAPB), which has 30 members. Earlier "discrete", he argues according to his comrades without ever raising his voice."His dedication was through exercises rather than speeches", one of them says.

In the spring of 2013 they mobilize against the "demonstrations for everyoneOpposition against gay marriage, popular right and far right. On 1 May, Clement gets wounded in a fight with right-wing militants and ends up in the hospital where he will be sewn The next fight, June 5, will be fatal.

After his death, his family is indignant to see that he is sometimes represented as one of the initiators of the fight. According to all the testimonies gathered by the researchers of his relatives, teachers or neighbors, the young man was certainly determined in his political struggle, but never violent.

"He had an aversion to racism and people who did not accept each other. But he was never warlike, he never told me, skins, I hate them", says Alain Rivarol.

His fate does not move much in the camp on the other side. "He became a nice martyr when he was part of a group that decides that some people are fascists and have to be eliminated from society. He was looking for confrontation and he paid for it", answers Serge Ayoub, former head of skinheads in Paris, and at that time in contact with those involved in the deadly fight.

At the time of his death, Clement Meric was at the end of his treatment against inhibition of leukemia. "It felt good, it was part of the idea that he was going to do something nice, that he would be released from this weight", his father told the researchers.


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