Air pollution reduces Indian service life by 1.5 years – IN SCHOOL



Air pollution in the area shortens the lives of an average Indian by more than 1.5 years, scientists say that better air quality could lead to a significant extension of human life around the world.

Researchers said that if concentrations of PM2.5 were limited globally to the World Health Organization (WHO) air quality guidelines of 10 micrograms per square cubic meter, the global life expectancy would be 0.59 years longer on average.

The advantage of achieving the strict target would be particularly high in countries with the highest current levels of pollution, with about 0.8-1.4 years of extra survival in countries such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and China.

This is the first time data on air pollution and lifetime have been studied together to investigate the global variations to find out how they affect the overall life expectancy.

The researchers at the University of Texas at Austin in the US looked at outdoor air pollution by particles (PM) smaller than 2.5 microns. These fine particles can penetrate deep into the lungs and respiration PM2.5 is associated with an increased risk of heart attacks, strokes, respiratory diseases and cancer.

PM2.5 pollution comes from power plants, cars & trucks, fires, agriculture and industrial emissions.

They found that the life expectancy of environmental PM2.5 is particularly high in polluted countries such as Bangladesh (1.87 years), Egypt (1.85 years), Pakistan (1.56 years), Saudi Arabia (1.48 years) , Nigeria (1.28 years) and China (1.25 years).

According to the study, India had a life expectancy of 1.53 years.

The team used data from the Global Burden of Disease Study to measure exposure to PM2.5 air pollution and its effects in 185 countries.

They then quantified the national impact on life expectancy for each country individually and on a global scale.

"The fact that fine particles of air pollution is a big global killer is already well known," said Joshua Apte, who led the study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

"We were able to systematically identify how air pollution also significantly shortens lives around the world, and what we have found is that air pollution has a very large impact on survival – on average about a year worldwide," said Apte.

In the context of other significant symptoms that negatively influence human survival, Apte said that this is a large number.

"For example, it is significantly greater than the survival benefit that we might see if we combined treatments for both lung and breast cancer," he said.

"For a large part of Asia, if air pollution would be removed as a risk of death, 60-year-olds would have a 15 to 20 percent higher chance of becoming 85 or older," he added.


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Air pollution reduces Indian service life by 1.5 years – IN SCHOOL



Air pollution in the area shortens the lives of an average Indian by more than 1.5 years, scientists say that better air quality could lead to a significant extension of human life around the world.

Researchers said that if concentrations of PM2.5 were limited globally to the World Health Organization (WHO) air quality guidelines of 10 micrograms per square cubic meter, the global life expectancy would be 0.59 years longer on average.

The advantage of achieving the strict target would be particularly high in countries with the highest current levels of pollution, with about 0.8-1.4 years of extra survival in countries such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and China.

This is the first time data on air pollution and lifetime have been studied together to investigate the global variations to find out how they affect the overall life expectancy.

The researchers at the University of Texas at Austin in the US looked at outdoor air pollution by particles (PM) smaller than 2.5 microns. These fine particles can penetrate deep into the lungs and respiration PM2.5 is associated with an increased risk of heart attacks, strokes, respiratory diseases and cancer.

PM2.5 pollution comes from power plants, cars & trucks, fires, agriculture and industrial emissions.

They found that the life expectancy of environmental PM2.5 is particularly high in polluted countries such as Bangladesh (1.87 years), Egypt (1.85 years), Pakistan (1.56 years), Saudi Arabia (1.48 years) , Nigeria (1.28 years) and China (1.25 years).

According to the study, India had a life expectancy of 1.53 years.

The team used data from the Global Burden of Disease Study to measure exposure to PM2.5 air pollution and its effects in 185 countries.

They then quantified the national impact on life expectancy for each country individually and on a global scale.

"The fact that fine particles of air pollution is a big global killer is already well known," said Joshua Apte, who led the study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

"We were able to systematically identify how air pollution also significantly shortens lives around the world, and what we have found is that air pollution has a very large impact on survival – on average about a year worldwide," said Apte.

In the context of other significant symptoms that negatively influence human survival, Apte said that this is a large number.

"For example, it is significantly greater than the survival benefit that we might see if we combined treatments for both lung and breast cancer," he said.

"For a large part of Asia, if air pollution would be removed as a risk of death, 60-year-olds would have a 15 to 20 percent higher chance of becoming 85 or older," he added.


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