Deep wrinkles in the forehead may indicate a risk of cardiovascular disease



People who have far more deep wrinkles than their age are at a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to a study.

"We have examined wrinkles in the forehead as a marker because it is so simple and visual. Just looking at someone's face could be an alarm, then we could give advice to reduce the risk," said Yolande Esquirol, associate professor at Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse in France.

The advice can consist of simple changes in lifestyle, such as exercising more or eating healthier.

"Of course, if you have a person with a potential cardiovascular risk, you should check for classic risk factors such as blood pressure and lipid and blood glucose levels, but you might already share some recommendations about lifestyle factors," Esquirol said.

The risk of heart disease increases as people get older, but lifestyle and medical interventions can alleviate the danger. The challenge is to identify high-risk patients early enough to make a difference.

The study examined horizontal wrinkles in the forehead to see if they had any value in assessing cardiovascular risk in a group of 3,200 working adults.

Participants, all of whom were healthy and were 32, 42, 52 and 62 years old at the beginning of the study, were examined by physicians who assigned scores depending on the number and depth of the wrinkles on their foreheads.

A score of zero meant no wrinkles while a score of three & # 39; countless deep wrinkles & # 39; meant.

The study participants were followed for 20 years, during which time 233 died of various causes. Of this, 15.2 percent had two and three wrinkles.

Approximately 6.6 percent had one ripple and 2.1 percent had no wrinkles.

The researchers discovered that people with a wrinkle score of one had a slightly higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease than people without wrinkles.

Those with wrinkle scores of two and three were almost 10 times more likely to die compared to those who had zero wrinkle counts, after adjustments for age, gender, training, smoking status, blood pressure, heart rate, diabetes and lipid levels,


"The higher your wrinkle score, the more your cardiovascular mortality risk increases," said Esquirol.

Furrows in your forehead are not a better method to evaluate cardiovascular risk than existing methods, such as blood pressure and lipid profiles, but they might be able to lift a red flag in a simple way.

(This story is not edited by Business Standard staff and is automatically generated from a syndicated feed.)


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Deep wrinkles in the forehead may indicate a risk of cardiovascular disease



People who have far more deep wrinkles than their age are at a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to a study.

"We have examined wrinkles in the forehead as a marker because it is so simple and visual. Just looking at someone's face could be an alarm, then we could give advice to reduce the risk," said Yolande Esquirol, associate professor at Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse in France.

The advice can consist of simple changes in lifestyle, such as exercising more or eating healthier.

"Of course, if you have a person with a potential cardiovascular risk, you should check for classic risk factors such as blood pressure and lipid and blood glucose levels, but you might already share some recommendations about lifestyle factors," Esquirol said.

The risk of heart disease increases as people get older, but lifestyle and medical interventions can alleviate the danger. The challenge is to identify high-risk patients early enough to make a difference.

The study examined horizontal wrinkles in the forehead to see if they had any value in assessing cardiovascular risk in a group of 3,200 working adults.

Participants, all of whom were healthy and were 32, 42, 52 and 62 years old at the beginning of the study, were examined by physicians who assigned scores depending on the number and depth of the wrinkles on their foreheads.

A score of zero meant no wrinkles while a score of three & # 39; countless deep wrinkles & # 39; meant.

The study participants were followed for 20 years, during which time 233 died of various causes. Of this, 15.2 percent had two and three wrinkles.

Approximately 6.6 percent had one ripple and 2.1 percent had no wrinkles.

The researchers discovered that people with a wrinkle score of one had a slightly higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease than people without wrinkles.

Those with wrinkle scores of two and three were almost 10 times more likely to die compared to those who had zero wrinkle counts, after adjustments for age, gender, training, smoking status, blood pressure, heart rate, diabetes and lipid levels,


"The higher your wrinkle score, the more your cardiovascular mortality risk increases," said Esquirol.

Furrows in your forehead are not a better method to evaluate cardiovascular risk than existing methods, such as blood pressure and lipid profiles, but they might be able to lift a red flag in a simple way.

(This story is not edited by Business Standard staff and is automatically generated from a syndicated feed.)


Source link

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