Drones are legal from December 1: what are they? Restrictions to fly it in India



Flying drones in India will be legally made this year after the announcement of the Director-General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) on 27 August, i.e. yesterday.

The announcement was made on twitter by the Ministry of Civil Aviation to have a new policy for legalizing the drones with the name Drone requirements 1.0. According to the Indian government, the commercial use of drones on sectors such as agriculture, health and emergency response will come into force under new regulations from 1 December.

The basic operating procedure limits drone flights only during the day and also within Visual Line of Sight (VLOS).

Policy to fly drones in India in a legal way

The new rules for flying drones in India have clear guidelines on the classification of each of these aircraft categories, the flight areas and approvals that regulate the use of these machines.

Can not deliver food products on drones

Delivery of the payload, including food items, would not be permitted from now on, as the government has stated to PTI.

Classification of drones under the following categories

DGCA has classified them according to their weight under the new flying drone policy in India.

  • Nano: less than or equal to 250 grams
  • Micro: from 250 grams to 2kg
  • Small: from 2kg to 25kg
  • Average: from 25kg to 150kg
  • Large: larger than 150 kg

With the exception of nanodrons and those of the National Technical Research Organization and central intelligence services, the rest would be registered and given a unique identification number (UIN).

One-off registrations to fly drones

According to PTI, users must have one one-time registration of their drones, pilots and owners. For each flight (exempted for the nano category), users must request permission to fly on a mobile app whose name has not yet been mentioned.

What are drones and what are their applications?

Drones are used in situations where a manned flight is considered too risky or difficult. Drones can fly autonomously without a person in control and work without pilots on board, whose flight (speed, navigation, aerobatics, etc.) is controlled by on-board computers.

Use of drones

  • Mapping
  • Survey
  • Commercial photography
  • Security risk
  • Monitoring the livestock by the farmers

At the moment e-commerce companies are looking to use them for deliveries to consumers.

Ineffective measures by the state and the central government

According to News 18, a study by the Observer Research Foundation (ORF) shows that ad hoc measures taken by the state and the central government in India have not been effective when it comes to privacy and prohibited areas, air traffic, the management of terrorist threats and civil liability have not been addressed correctly.

Despite the ban on the use of drones in India, the drones are widely used, especially by wedding photographers to record the activities.

Notifications for banning drones in India

October 7, 2014

  • DGCA has published a notice on the subject stating that, until such regulations have been issued, no non-government agency, organization or person will launch a UAS into Indian civil airspace for any purpose.

April 21, 2016

  • Two years later, first draft guidelines were issued for the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to obtain Unique Identification Number (UIN)

November 2017

  • After a year and a half of inactivity, the DGCA again issued a new set of guidelines in November 2017, highlighting the requirements for using Civil Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS).

Restrictions to fly drones in India

RPAs or drones can not be flown within 5 km from the edges of airports in Mumbai, Delhi, Chennai, Kolkata, Bengaluru and Hyderabad and within 3 km of the perimeter of another airport.

According to regulations, they can not be operated at strategic locations, vital and military facilities and Vijay Chowk in Delhi, including wedding photography,

They can not be operated within 25 km of the international border with Line of Control (LoC), Line of Actual Control (LAC) and Actually Ground Position Line (AGPL).

These drones can not be operated from a mobile platform, such as a moving vehicle, a ship or an airplane. Flying drones in eco-sensitive zones around national parks and nature reserves are not permitted without prior permission.

Violations of the regulations

Violations under this rule will be dealt with in the relevant sections of the Indian Penal Code and the Aircraft Act 1934.

What does the Aircraft Act 1934 say?

It is an act to make better arrangements for the control of the manufacture, possession, use, operation, sale, import and export of aircraft.

Interested in general knowledge and current affairs? Click here to keep up to date and know what is happening around the world with our G.K. and Current Affairs section.

If you want more updates on current issues, send your search by e-mail [email protected]


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Drones are legal from December 1: what are they? Restrictions to fly it in India



Flying drones in India will be legally made this year after the announcement of the Director-General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) on 27 August, i.e. yesterday.

The announcement was made on twitter by the Ministry of Civil Aviation to have a new policy for legalizing the drones with the name Drone requirements 1.0. According to the Indian government, the commercial use of drones on sectors such as agriculture, health and emergency response will come into force under new regulations from 1 December.

The basic operating procedure limits drone flights only during the day and also within Visual Line of Sight (VLOS).

Policy to fly drones in India in a legal way

The new rules for flying drones in India have clear guidelines on the classification of each of these aircraft categories, the flight areas and approvals that regulate the use of these machines.

Can not deliver food products on drones

Delivery of the payload, including food items, would not be permitted from now on, as the government has stated to PTI.

Classification of drones under the following categories

DGCA has classified them according to their weight under the new flying drone policy in India.

  • Nano: less than or equal to 250 grams
  • Micro: from 250 grams to 2kg
  • Small: from 2kg to 25kg
  • Average: from 25kg to 150kg
  • Large: larger than 150 kg

With the exception of nanodrons and those of the National Technical Research Organization and central intelligence services, the rest would be registered and given a unique identification number (UIN).

One-off registrations to fly drones

According to PTI, users must have one one-time registration of their drones, pilots and owners. For each flight (exempted for the nano category), users must request permission to fly on a mobile app whose name has not yet been mentioned.

What are drones and what are their applications?

Drones are used in situations where a manned flight is considered too risky or difficult. Drones can fly autonomously without a person in control and work without pilots on board, whose flight (speed, navigation, aerobatics, etc.) is controlled by on-board computers.

Use of drones

  • Mapping
  • Survey
  • Commercial photography
  • Security risk
  • Monitoring the livestock by the farmers

At the moment e-commerce companies are looking to use them for deliveries to consumers.

Ineffective measures by the state and the central government

According to News 18, a study by the Observer Research Foundation (ORF) shows that ad hoc measures taken by the state and the central government in India have not been effective when it comes to privacy and prohibited areas, air traffic, the management of terrorist threats and civil liability have not been addressed correctly.

Despite the ban on the use of drones in India, the drones are widely used, especially by wedding photographers to record the activities.

Notifications for banning drones in India

October 7, 2014

  • DGCA has published a notice on the subject stating that, until such regulations have been issued, no non-government agency, organization or person will launch a UAS into Indian civil airspace for any purpose.

April 21, 2016

  • Two years later, first draft guidelines were issued for the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to obtain Unique Identification Number (UIN)

November 2017

  • After a year and a half of inactivity, the DGCA again issued a new set of guidelines in November 2017, highlighting the requirements for using Civil Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS).

Restrictions to fly drones in India

RPAs or drones can not be flown within 5 km from the edges of airports in Mumbai, Delhi, Chennai, Kolkata, Bengaluru and Hyderabad and within 3 km of the perimeter of another airport.

According to regulations, they can not be operated at strategic locations, vital and military facilities and Vijay Chowk in Delhi, including wedding photography,

They can not be operated within 25 km of the international border with Line of Control (LoC), Line of Actual Control (LAC) and Actually Ground Position Line (AGPL).

These drones can not be operated from a mobile platform, such as a moving vehicle, a ship or an airplane. Flying drones in eco-sensitive zones around national parks and nature reserves are not permitted without prior permission.

Violations of the regulations

Violations under this rule will be dealt with in the relevant sections of the Indian Penal Code and the Aircraft Act 1934.

What does the Aircraft Act 1934 say?

It is an act to make better arrangements for the control of the manufacture, possession, use, operation, sale, import and export of aircraft.

Interested in general knowledge and current affairs? Click here to keep up to date and know what is happening around the world with our G.K. and Current Affairs section.

If you want more updates on current issues, send your search by e-mail [email protected]


Source link

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