Poco F1 First Impressions: The new flagship killer?



When an established brand decides to launch a new sub-brand, it raises a few eyebrows. The biggest reason is, why? What is the need for a new brand if you are already quite famous, being what you are? I had similar questions with my mind when I first heard about the new Poco brand that Xiaomi was planning to launch, and I got my answers today at the launch of the Poco F1.

Before I go deeper into what the phone brings to the table, let us first use the basics. Poco is a sub-brand that is heavily dependent on Xiaomi. It is similar to what Redmi is to the company, only Poco is geared towards speed enthusiasts and is a separate brand. It relies on the supply chain of Xiaomi to buy components (which is one of the reasons for the surprisingly affordable price) and for after-sales services. It is a global brand and will be available in approximately 50 markets that Xiaomi offers worldwide. But more importantly, the Poco F1 embodies the same philosophy with which OnePlus came on the market with: Flagship performance at budget prices. Of course, Xiaomi (I mean, Poco) had to cut the corners to lower the price, so there was a need for a new brand. You see, if Xiaomi launches the same phone with the & # 39; Mi & # 39; branding on the market, the expectations of the user will not only be about high performance, but design would also have become a priority. A new brand renounces that baggage of expectations. This allows you to experiment freely and if it fails, it fails. The mother brand did no harm.

Back to the drawing board

That is the background story of the new brand that I thought you should know. Now that the phone itself comes, the focus of the Poco F1 square is on speed, just like the rival he is trying to overthrow. There is of course the flagship Snapdragon 845 chipset that power it. A no-brainer if you expect promising high-end performance. But what is special is that there is a special mechanism to prevent the chipset from heating up too long, preventing CPU throttling. Poco calls it LiquidCool. But there is no liquid under the hood. Special copper pipes with vapors absorb heat from the chipset and spread them evenly over the body. This allows the Poco F1 to bypass the thermal control. We are testing whether the cooling mechanism actually leads to longer peak performances. There is also a maximum of 8 GB of RAM and 256 GB of storage space to work with. That is exactly what the highest variant of the OnePlus 6 offers with a price difference of almost Rs 14,000.

Are high-end performances enough to name a flagship?

However, naming the Poco F1 as a flagship would go too far. Although the hardware is absolutely among the most expensive Android flagships, the design is not like the Honor 10 or the OnePlus 6. Glass-backed design is an important feature of premium phones launched this year. Although that certainly makes them look good, your daily driver is extremely vulnerable and you ultimately make a claim and hide the premium design. The Poco F1 deserves that trend and goes for a good old polycarbonate housing. It is the same material that made the Nokia Lumia phones a sturdy package during the day. Add to that the armored edition in which Poco used Kevlar imported from DuPont, USA to give it extra durability and a non-smooth grip. However, it will get dirty if you use it with greasy hands. Again, this reminded me of the time that the OnePlus One came with a sandstone back. It was not the premium metal design that Samsung showed in their flagships at the time, but it stood out because it was functional and sustainable.

Cutting corners

The most uninteresting thing about the Poco F1 is the display. There is a 6,18-inch notch where the notch makes little sense. There are important edges around the panel. However, the notch does more than just store the front camera and the earphones. This time there is an IR blaster that supports the mechanism for unlocking the face to work in low light.

Although the hardware promises top performance, the Poco F1 concentrates on real-life performance. That is why there is the extra cooling device. We had the phone a few days before the launch and after a few hours of gaming (which of course works for us), the phone does not heat up very much. But not everyone is a gambling addict like us. Some get work done on their phone. For them there is the new Poco launcher that has been adapted from MIUI 9.5 and has an app-la !! The animations of the launcher are also accelerated, so that it feels faster and apps are launched just as quickly as any other flagship smartphone. The software has a few bugs that need to be ironed out. For example, icons are not displayed in the status bar when there is a new notification. In fact, no icons appear in that notched space at all. We also encountered some instability problems when the volume shakers no longer work until the phone was restarted. Nothing that a new update does not care for.

Yet another AI camera

More than speed people now pay more for better cameras on smartphones. The F1 offers a lot of photography enthusiasts. It uses the Mi-camera app with integrated AI scene detection. It automatically detects what you are photographing and adjusts the camera parameters. You will receive a primary 12MP sensor with a 5 MP depth sensor for portrait photo & # 39; s. In front is a 20MP camera that depends on pixel binning to capture more details in low light with less noise. The photos are pretty good for the first few recordings we made. We will test it even more for the in-depth evaluation.

Battery life as a mid-ranger

Completing the package is a 4000mAh battery, a rarity in flagships that limits the battery capacity at about 3300mAh. It is the reason why this is not the smallest phone there is and why we could manage a gambling session for an hour without having to worry about the phone dying out at midnight. Fortunately, the included charger supports Quick Charge 3.0 and your phone is quickly rolled up.

Read also:Spec comparison: Xiaomi Poco F1 vs. OnePlus 6 vs. Zenfone 5z vs. Honor 10

First impression:

Given the whole package, it is easy to see who the phone is for. The Poco F1 certainly does not look like the premium Samsung or Huawei flagships, but it promises high-end performance. It lasts a long time and is durable, unlike the glass-back phones. If I'm wrong, this is something that a Redmi Note 5 Pro user would want to upgrade. A no-nonsense artist who is easy on bag.

<! – commented @ 6-July-2016

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Source link

Poco F1 First Impressions: The new flagship killer?



When an established brand decides to launch a new sub-brand, it raises a few eyebrows. The biggest reason is, why? What is the need for a new brand if you are already quite famous, being what you are? I had similar questions with my mind when I first heard about the new Poco brand that Xiaomi was planning to launch, and I got my answers today at the launch of the Poco F1.

Before I go deeper into what the phone brings to the table, let us first use the basics. Poco is a sub-brand that is heavily dependent on Xiaomi. It is similar to what Redmi is to the company, only Poco is geared towards speed enthusiasts and is a separate brand. It relies on the supply chain of Xiaomi to buy components (which is one of the reasons for the surprisingly affordable price) and for after-sales services. It is a global brand and will be available in approximately 50 markets that Xiaomi offers worldwide. But more importantly, the Poco F1 embodies the same philosophy with which OnePlus came on the market with: Flagship performance at budget prices. Of course, Xiaomi (I mean, Poco) had to cut the corners to lower the price, so there was a need for a new brand. You see, if Xiaomi launches the same phone with the & # 39; Mi & # 39; branding on the market, the expectations of the user will not only be about high performance, but design would also have become a priority. A new brand renounces that baggage of expectations. This allows you to experiment freely and if it fails, it fails. The mother brand did no harm.

Back to the drawing board

That is the background story of the new brand that I thought you should know. Now that the phone itself comes, the focus of the Poco F1 square is on speed, just like the rival he is trying to overthrow. There is of course the flagship Snapdragon 845 chipset that power it. A no-brainer if you expect promising high-end performance. But what is special is that there is a special mechanism to prevent the chipset from heating up too long, preventing CPU throttling. Poco calls it LiquidCool. But there is no liquid under the hood. Special copper pipes with vapors absorb heat from the chipset and spread them evenly over the body. This allows the Poco F1 to bypass the thermal control. We are testing whether the cooling mechanism actually leads to longer peak performances. There is also a maximum of 8 GB of RAM and 256 GB of storage space to work with. That is exactly what the highest variant of the OnePlus 6 offers with a price difference of almost Rs 14,000.

Are high-end performances enough to name a flagship?

However, naming the Poco F1 as a flagship would go too far. Although the hardware is absolutely among the most expensive Android flagships, the design is not like the Honor 10 or the OnePlus 6. Glass-backed design is an important feature of premium phones launched this year. Although that certainly makes them look good, your daily driver is extremely vulnerable and you ultimately make a claim and hide the premium design. The Poco F1 deserves that trend and goes for a good old polycarbonate housing. It is the same material that made the Nokia Lumia phones a sturdy package during the day. Add to that the armored edition in which Poco used Kevlar imported from DuPont, USA to give it extra durability and a non-smooth grip. However, it will get dirty if you use it with greasy hands. Again, this reminded me of the time that the OnePlus One came with a sandstone back. It was not the premium metal design that Samsung showed in their flagships at the time, but it stood out because it was functional and sustainable.

Cutting corners

The most uninteresting thing about the Poco F1 is the display. There is a 6,18-inch notch where the notch makes little sense. There are important edges around the panel. However, the notch does more than just store the front camera and the earphones. This time there is an IR blaster that supports the mechanism for unlocking the face to work in low light.

Although the hardware promises top performance, the Poco F1 concentrates on real-life performance. That is why there is the extra cooling device. We had the phone a few days before the launch and after a few hours of gaming (which of course works for us), the phone does not heat up very much. But not everyone is a gambling addict like us. Some get work done on their phone. For them there is the new Poco launcher that has been adapted from MIUI 9.5 and has an app-la !! The animations of the launcher are also accelerated, so that it feels faster and apps are launched just as quickly as any other flagship smartphone. The software has a few bugs that need to be ironed out. For example, icons are not displayed in the status bar when there is a new notification. In fact, no icons appear in that notched space at all. We also encountered some instability problems when the volume shakers no longer work until the phone was restarted. Nothing that a new update does not care for.

Yet another AI camera

More than speed people now pay more for better cameras on smartphones. The F1 offers a lot of photography enthusiasts. It uses the Mi-camera app with integrated AI scene detection. It automatically detects what you are photographing and adjusts the camera parameters. You will receive a primary 12MP sensor with a 5 MP depth sensor for portrait photo & # 39; s. In front is a 20MP camera that depends on pixel binning to capture more details in low light with less noise. The photos are pretty good for the first few recordings we made. We will test it even more for the in-depth evaluation.

Battery life as a mid-ranger

Completing the package is a 4000mAh battery, a rarity in flagships that limits the battery capacity at about 3300mAh. It is the reason why this is not the smallest phone there is and why we could manage a gambling session for an hour without worrying about the phone dying out at midnight. Fortunately, the included charger supports Quick Charge 3.0 and your phone is quickly rolled up.

Read also:Spec comparison: Xiaomi Poco F1 vs. OnePlus 6 vs. Zenfone 5z vs. Honor 10

First impression:

Given the whole package, it is easy to see who the phone is for. The Poco F1 certainly does not look like the premium Samsung or Huawei flagships, but it promises high-end performance. It lasts a long time and is durable, unlike the glass-back phones. If I'm wrong, this is something that a Redmi Note 5 Pro user would want to upgrade. A no-nonsense artist who is easy on bag.

<! – commented @ 6-July-2016

->

<! –

->


Source link

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