Shark was outside the bathing areas, say RNLI



By Niall Murray and Aoife Moore

The shark that bites a fisherman on a boat outside the harbor of Cork during the weekend was far from near bathing water, a spokesman for a lifeboat assured the public.

The blue shark that bit the fisherman was captured 13 miles southeast of Cork harbor.

Described as an esophagus or flesh wound, bite occurred on the forearm of the fisherman at the bottom of the forearm around Saturday, when the visiting fishermen were about 20 km southeast of the port of Cork.

The fisherman, Richard Malcolmson, was part of a group from the north that fished for sharks on the chartered deep-sea fishing boat, Deora Dé. He tried to unhook the fish when the bite occurred.

"The injury is absolutely not life-changing and it was a recoverable flesh wound," said a spokesman for Crosshaven RNLI.

He was successful in catching the shark, just bad luck in unhooking.

The lifeboat crew was called at about 6 p.m. and the volunteers were immediately launched.

"The boys on board did everything right," said the lifeboat spokesman. "It was a small pinch while fishing, and the first aid he received from the men on his boat was unrivaled."

He said that while blue sharks are common, this was the first shark that the crew had attended.

Crosshaven RNLI came to the aid of Richard Malcolmson, who was bitten by his blue arm on his left arm.

"I would like everyone to keep in mind that the shark was nowhere near for fishing or swimming," he said. "This was more of a fish accident than a shark attack, there was a bit of a struggle when you pulled the shark aboard."

Although blue sharks are the most common shark species in Irish waters, they rarely bite people. They usually feed on small fish and squid and can live for about 20 years.

Until 2013 the blue shark was involved in only 13 bite incidents with people, four of which were fatally terminated.

The operation to give the man medical attention included direct communication between those on the fishing vessel and a emergency physician at Cork University Hospital (CUH).

Our first aid would not win any beauty prizes, but … we ran out of bleeding and disguised it, "said James Linehan, who was also on board the Deora Dé.

The boat steamed towards Crosshaven and connected with the Crosshaven RNLI crew about 7 km south of Roches Point at the harbor entrance. The man's wound was well secured before being transferred to the lifeboat, where further accident care was provided.

An ambulance crew met the lifeboat on its return to Crosshaven and brought it to Cork University Hospital for treatment.

Mr. Linehan thanked the lifeboat volunteers, the Coast Guard teams in Cork and Valentia, the doctor from CUH & # 39; s Medico Cork service, providing medical telephone services to ships in Irish territorial waters, and the national ambulance service.


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Shark was outside the bathing areas, say RNLI



By Niall Murray and Aoife Moore

The shark that bites a fisherman on a boat outside the harbor of Cork during the weekend was far from near bathing water, a spokesman for a lifeboat assured the public.

The blue shark that bit the fisherman was captured 13 miles southeast of Cork harbor.

Described as an esophagus or flesh wound, bite occurred on the forearm of the fisherman at the bottom of the forearm around Saturday, when the visiting fishermen were about 20 km southeast of the port of Cork.

The fisherman, Richard Malcolmson, was part of a group from the north that fished for sharks on the chartered deep-sea fishing boat, Deora Dé. He tried to unhook the fish when the bite occurred.

"The injury is absolutely not life-changing and it was a recoverable flesh wound," said a spokesman for Crosshaven RNLI.

He was successful in catching the shark, just bad luck in unhooking.

The lifeboat crew was called at about 6 p.m. and the volunteers were immediately launched.

"The boys on board did everything right," said the lifeboat spokesman. "It was a small pinch while fishing, and the first aid he received from the men on his boat was unrivaled."

He said that while blue sharks are common, this was the first shark that the crew had attended.

Crosshaven RNLI came to the aid of Richard Malcolmson, who was bitten by his blue arm on his left arm.

"I would like everyone to keep in mind that the shark was nowhere near for fishing or swimming," he said. "This was more of a fish accident than a shark attack, there was a bit of a struggle when you pulled the shark aboard."

Although blue sharks are the most common shark species in Irish waters, they rarely bite people. They usually feed on small fish and squid and can live for about 20 years.

Until 2013 the blue shark was involved in only 13 bite incidents with people, four of which were fatally terminated.

The operation to give the man medical attention included direct communication between those on the fishing vessel and a emergency physician at Cork University Hospital (CUH).

Our first aid would not win any beauty prizes, but … we ran out of bleeding and disguised it, "said James Linehan, who was also on board the Deora Dé.

The boat steamed towards Crosshaven and connected with the Crosshaven RNLI crew about 7 km south of Roches Point at the harbor entrance. The man's wound was well secured before being transferred to the lifeboat, where further accident care was provided.

An ambulance crew met the lifeboat on its return to Crosshaven and brought it to Cork University Hospital for treatment.

Mr. Linehan thanked the lifeboat volunteers, the Coast Guard teams in Cork and Valentia, the doctor from CUH & # 39; s Medico Cork service, providing medical telephone services to ships in Irish territorial waters, and the national ambulance service.


Source link

Shark was outside the bathing areas, say RNLI



By Niall Murray and Aoife Moore

The shark that bites a fisherman on a boat outside the harbor of Cork during the weekend was far from near bathing water, a spokesman for a lifeboat assured the public.

The blue shark that bit the fisherman was captured 13 miles southeast of Cork harbor.

Described as an esophagus or flesh wound, bite occurred on the forearm of the fisherman at the bottom of the forearm around Saturday, when the visiting fishermen were about 20 km southeast of the port of Cork.

The fisherman, Richard Malcolmson, was part of a group from the north that fished for sharks on the chartered deep-sea fishing boat, Deora Dé. He tried to unhook the fish when the bite occurred.

"The injury is absolutely not life-changing and it was a recoverable flesh wound," said a spokesman for Crosshaven RNLI.

He was successful in catching the shark, just bad luck in unhooking.

The lifeboat crew was called at about 6 p.m. and the volunteers were immediately launched.

"The boys on board did everything right," said the lifeboat spokesman. "It was a small pinch while fishing, and the first aid he received from the men on his boat was unrivaled."

He said that while blue sharks are common, this was the first shark that the crew had attended.

Crosshaven RNLI came to the aid of Richard Malcolmson, who was bitten by his blue arm on his left arm.

"I would like everyone to keep in mind that the shark was nowhere near for fishing or swimming," he said. "This was more of a fish accident than a shark attack, there was a bit of a struggle when you pulled the shark aboard."

Although blue sharks are the most common shark species in Irish waters, they rarely bite people. They usually feed on small fish and squid and can live for about 20 years.

Until 2013 the blue shark was involved in only 13 bite incidents with people, four of which were fatally terminated.

The operation to give the man medical attention included direct communication between those on the fishing vessel and a emergency physician at Cork University Hospital (CUH).

Our first aid would not win any beauty prizes, but … we ran out of bleeding and disguised it, "said James Linehan, who was also on board the Deora Dé.

The boat steamed towards Crosshaven and connected with the Crosshaven RNLI crew about 7 km south of Roches Point at the harbor entrance. The man's wound was well secured before being transferred to the lifeboat, where further accident care was provided.

An ambulance crew met the lifeboat on its return to Crosshaven and brought it to Cork University Hospital for treatment.

Mr. Linehan thanked the lifeboat volunteers, the Coast Guard teams in Cork and Valentia, the doctor from CUH & # 39; s Medico Cork service, providing medical telephone services to ships in Irish territorial waters, and the national ambulance service.


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