Sixty medical staff now on board for field hospital in the Phoenix Park




The gigantic altar at the place where Pope Francis will give the closing Mass in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Sam Boal / RollingNews.ie
The gigantic altar at the place where Pope Francis will give the closing Mass in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Sam Boal / RollingNews.ie

Eilish O & # 39; Regan

The field hospital set up in the Phoenix Park to treat people who become seriously ill during the papal mass of tomorrow is staffed by 60 doctors and nurses.

The institution set up at St Mary's Hospital in Phoenix Park, which is primarily used for a nursing home and other facilities, has five CPR bays and 16 beds and baby cots.

Dr. Patrick Plunkett, the retired former head of the emergency department at St James's Hospital, and former mortal of St. John Ambulance, said there are detailed plans to cater for medical emergencies during the event.

The crowd of 500,000 visitors to the mass is twice the population of the city of Cork.

The presence of so many doctors means that decisions can be made about the treatment of patients on the spot, and there will be no deluge of unnecessary admissions to local hospitals.

Emergency advisers estimate that up to 750 people may need hospital treatment and that between 1,000 and 3,000 first-aid is needed on the ground.

Dr. Plunkett, who was appointed medical director for the event earlier this week, said that a number of people may have a heart attack or complications due to pneumonia.

"Others may break or slip a leg," he said.

Members of the crowd will be divided into a grid system of about 1500 to 3000 and there will be "spotters" on elevated sites to be alert to people who fall ill or need help.

Dr. Plunkett said these spotters are essential, otherwise the volunteer organizations that offer emergency aid on the spot would not be able to see them.

The spotter can send the paramedic to the affected public.

The patient is taken to a hub with a buggy, a tent of 12 meters by 12 meters with advanced paramedics and medical staff.

Visiting cards from Pope: travel, parking and walking guides for the Pope's visit to Dublin and Knock

Seriously ill people may have to be transported to one of the city hospitals, but due to the lack of traffic on the road, this can be done faster than usual with an ambulance, he added.

He warned that people could stay for eight hours and that they were advised to bring some seats if they ran the risk of coming under pressure.

They will also make a considerable walk – which could cost them up to an hour and a half.

Every hospital in the city that receives patients from the event has its own internal plan.

Dr. Plunkett advised people to get prepared and have good shoes, a poncho for protection against the rain, a hat and sunscreen as well as food and water.

If they have to take medication, they have to make sure they take it with them.

If they use medication, they must make a list so that doctors who are informed need medical care.

Dr. Emily O & # 39; Conor, emergency consultant at nearby Connolly Hospital said: A & E doctors are now reassured about the planning to take care of the patients.

"There is still an unpredictable element about what will happen.

"But that's what urgent medicine is all about," she added.

Irish Independent


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Sixty medical staff now on board for field hospital in the Phoenix Park




The gigantic altar at the place where Pope Francis will give the closing Mass in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Sam Boal / RollingNews.ie
The gigantic altar at the place where Pope Francis will give the closing Mass in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Sam Boal / RollingNews.ie

Eilish O & # 39; Regan

The field hospital set up in the Phoenix Park to treat people who become seriously ill during the papal mass of tomorrow is staffed by 60 doctors and nurses.

The institution set up at St Mary's Hospital in Phoenix Park, which is primarily used for a nursing home and other facilities, has five CPR bays and 16 beds and baby cots.

Dr. Patrick Plunkett, the retired former head of the emergency department at St James's Hospital, and former mortal of St. John Ambulance, said there are detailed plans to cater for medical emergencies during the event.

The crowd of 500,000 visitors to the mass is twice the population of the city of Cork.

The presence of so many doctors means that decisions can be made about the treatment of patients on the spot, and there will be no deluge of unnecessary admissions to local hospitals.

Emergency advisers estimate that up to 750 people may need hospital treatment and that between 1,000 and 3,000 first-aid is needed on the ground.

Dr. Plunkett, who was appointed medical director for the event earlier this week, said that a number of people may have a heart attack or complications due to pneumonia.

"Others may break or slip a leg," he said.

Members of the crowd will be divided into a grid system of about 1500 to 3000 and there will be "spotters" on elevated sites to be alert to people who fall ill or need help.

Dr. Plunkett said these spotters are essential, otherwise the volunteer organizations that offer emergency aid on the spot would not be able to see them.

The spotter can send the paramedic to the affected public.

The patient is taken to a hub with a buggy, a tent of 12 meters by 12 meters with advanced paramedics and medical staff.

Visiting cards from Pope: travel, parking and walking guides for the Pope's visit to Dublin and Knock

Seriously ill people may have to be transported to one of the city hospitals, but due to the lack of traffic on the road, this can be done faster than usual with an ambulance, he added.

He warned that people could stay for eight hours and that they were advised to bring some seats if they ran the risk of coming under pressure.

They will also make a considerable walk – which could cost them up to an hour and a half.

Every hospital in the city that receives patients from the event has its own internal plan.

Dr. Plunkett advised people to get prepared and have good shoes, a poncho for protection against the rain, a hat and sunscreen as well as food and water.

If they have to take medication, they have to make sure they take it with them.

If they use medication, they must make a list so that doctors who are informed need medical care.

Dr. Emily O & # 39; Conor, emergency consultant at nearby Connolly Hospital said: A & E doctors are now reassured about the planning to take care of the patients.

"There is still an unpredictable element about what will happen.

"But that's what urgent medicine is all about," she added.

Irish Independent


Source link

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