Lebanese lawn under the microscope .. Is it a cure?



A university professor in Lebanon keeps his office in factories where the researchers hope that one of the country's worst exports will become a lucrative medical product.

Figures from the United Nations show that Lebanon now ranks third after Morocco and Afghanistan on the list of worldwide cannabis resin sources.

Although Lebanese cannabis can be appreciated by smokers, almost nothing is known about its therapeutic value, which Professor Mohamed Marwa hopes will change, believing that local species can have special benefits.

The government has given permission for Dr. Marwa, but has not yet formally agreed to the establishment of the Hemp Hemp Medical Center at the Lebanese American University, which opened in May and seeks to join 10 institutions worldwide that are studying the drug.

"His impression is that he will have a different medical value because of the climatic conditions in the Bekaa Valley, especially precipitation, periods of brightness of the sun and soil type," he said at work on the Lebanese American university campus in Jbeil, where the center is located.

He said he expected that he would find different percentages of active chemicals that could contribute to the treatment of cancer, epilepsy, diabetes and other diseases.

Medicinal plants
Dr. Wassim Shababi, one of the research partners of Dr. ir. Marwa injects pink leukemia cells with different concentrations of hashish oil, while a group of students follow him to follow him.

"We are studying the effect of hash oil on the growth of the (cancer) cell … this is the first time this happens in Lebanon," he said.

The project started in 2015 when two graduate students dr. Marwa contacted to see a message about the plant. It took him three years to convince the university council, the ministry of health and the agency for the fight against anesthesia.

Mr Marwa is expected to face obstacles, but he hopes that the government will soon agree to use cannabis as a painkiller.

When people visit him to ask him about the use of hashish in relieving pain, Marwa does not know what to say to them. "I say it honestly because it is a sensitive subject," he said. "It is the wine of cannabis, the oil of cannabis, I tell him what I know, how to use it, I tell him what I know, the internet is there."


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Lebanese lawn under the microscope .. Is it a cure?



A university professor in Lebanon keeps his office in factories where the researchers hope that one of the country's worst exports will become a lucrative medical product.

Figures from the United Nations show that Lebanon now ranks third after Morocco and Afghanistan on the list of worldwide cannabis resin sources.

Although Lebanese cannabis can be appreciated by smokers, almost nothing is known about its therapeutic value, which Professor Mohamed Marwa hopes will change, believing that local species can have special benefits.

The government has given permission for Dr. Marwa, but has not yet formally agreed to the establishment of the Hemp Hemp Medical Center at the Lebanese American University, which opened in May and seeks to join 10 institutions worldwide that are studying the drug.

"His impression is that he will have a different medical value because of the climatic conditions in the Bekaa Valley, especially precipitation, periods of brightness of the sun and soil type," he said at work on the Lebanese American university campus in Jbeil, where the center is located.

He said he expected that he would find different percentages of active chemicals that could contribute to the treatment of cancer, epilepsy, diabetes and other diseases.

Medicinal plants
Dr. Wassim Shababi, one of the research partners of Dr. ir. Marwa injects pink leukemia cells with different concentrations of hashish oil, while a group of students follow him to follow him.

"We are studying the effect of hash oil on the growth of the (cancer) cell … this is the first time this happens in Lebanon," he said.

The project started in 2015 when two graduate students dr. Marwa contacted to see a message about the plant. It took him three years to convince the university council, the ministry of health and the agency for the fight against anesthesia.

Mr Marwa is expected to face obstacles, but he hopes that the government will soon agree to use cannabis as a painkiller.

When people visit him to ask him about the use of hashish in relieving pain, Marwa does not know what to say to them. "I say it honestly because it is a sensitive subject," he said. "It is the wine of cannabis, the oil of cannabis, I tell him what I know, how to use it, I tell him what I know, the internet is there."


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