Bottles store employees leave shaken after heavy robbery 1 NEWS NOW



Six weeks after the roll-out of the new city bus network of the capital, there is fierce criticism of the way it operates from commuters.

A packed meeting in Kilbirnie this afternoon, organized by the Greater Wellington Regional Council responsible for the refurbishment, saw the local population express their concern about the new system.

Commuters said longer travel times, removing some routes and unreliable schedules were unacceptable.

One resident of Strathmore said that the neighborhood suffers from services that have been removed.

"I do not think this is reasonable if you have teenage children and they catch two buses out of town at night and then there is no bus to take them up the hill so they have to walk," she said.

"Because the network is such a disaster, your figures will be completely distorted by no one using the buses," another man said about the use of the network by the municipality.

A resident of Hataitai said that removing a service that brought the local people from Hataitai to Kilbirnie stopped elderly people traveling directly to the supermarket, doctors and library.

The association of users of public transport has doubts about the safety of the new double deckers.

"I wonder who in the regional council decided to bring them to Wellington, knowing that there is a cardiac arrest, how on earth can they get the passenger out?", Said Kara Lipski.

Frankie Kinraid calls for lower rates until the problems are resolved.

Reaching Kilbirnie has disappeared from taking her maximum from 35 minutes to an hour and 35 minutes with the new system.

Mrs. Kinraid said she was thrown on the bus doors last week in a bus full of commuters and now hopes there will be no serious incident.

Greater Wellington Regional Council accepts that there are problems with operations.

President Chris Laidlaw said that an important reason why the new system was needed was due to an accumulation of bus congestion in the city.

He said that most problems arise from the design, which is made by consultants, the performance of operators of the service such as Tranzit and the information system.

"Perhaps the most annoying problem of all is that from the first day there has been a major failure in information technology," said Mr Laidlaw to the public meeting.

"Who knows why? Who knows why? None of us really understood why, but it's being improved every day."

Mr Laidlaw said that the staff work seven days a week to follow up errors in the information planning system and that a solution will soon be found.

At the moment the real-time schedules at bus stops sometimes allow buses to arrive before the report disappears, he said.

Members of the public were critical when Mr Laidlaw said that the system is functioning to a great extent and many commuters believe that transport works well.

Rongotai MP Paul Eagle stressed that commuters had to discuss their problems with suggestion boards that had been drawn up during the meeting and talk with regional councilors who were present.

The regional council has restored the off-peak service of a popular route between Miramar and Victoria University of Wellington after public criticism of the move.


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Bottles store employees leave shaken after heavy robbery 1 NEWS NOW



Six weeks after the roll-out of the new city bus network of the capital, there is fierce criticism of the way it operates from commuters.

A packed meeting in Kilbirnie this afternoon, organized by the Greater Wellington Regional Council responsible for the refurbishment, saw the local population express their concern about the new system.

Commuters said longer travel times, removing some routes and unreliable schedules were unacceptable.

One resident of Strathmore said that the neighborhood suffers from services that have been removed.

"I do not think this is reasonable if you have teenage children and they catch two buses out of town at night and then there is no bus to take them up the hill so they have to walk," she said.

"Because the network is such a disaster, your figures will be completely distorted by no one using the buses," another man said about the use of the network by the municipality.

A resident of Hataitai said that removing a service that brought the local people from Hataitai to Kilbirnie stopped elderly people traveling directly to the supermarket, doctors and library.

The association of users of public transport has doubts about the safety of the new double deckers.

"I wonder who in the regional council decided to bring them to Wellington, knowing that there is a cardiac arrest, how on earth can they get the passenger out?", Said Kara Lipski.

Frankie Kinraid calls for lower rates until the problems are resolved.

Reaching Kilbirnie has disappeared from taking her maximum from 35 minutes to an hour and 35 minutes with the new system.

Mrs. Kinraid said she was thrown on the bus doors last week in a bus full of commuters and now hopes there will be no serious incident.

Greater Wellington Regional Council accepts that there are problems with operations.

President Chris Laidlaw said that an important reason why the new system was needed was due to an accumulation of bus congestion in the city.

He said that most problems arise from the design, which is made by consultants, the performance of operators of the service such as Tranzit and the information system.

"Perhaps the most annoying problem of all is that from the first day there has been a major failure in information technology," said Mr Laidlaw to the public meeting.

"Who knows why? Who knows why? None of us really understood why, but it's being improved every day."

Mr Laidlaw said that the staff work seven days a week to follow up errors in the information planning system and that a solution will soon be found.

At the moment the real-time schedules at bus stops sometimes allow buses to arrive before the report disappears, he said.

Members of the public were critical when Mr Laidlaw said that the system is functioning to a great extent and many commuters believe that transport works well.

Rongotai MP Paul Eagle stressed that commuters had to discuss their problems with suggestion boards that had been drawn up during the meeting and talk with regional councilors who were present.

The regional council has restored the off-peak service of a popular route between Miramar and Victoria University of Wellington after public criticism of the move.


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