Devoted caretaker has become a father figure for many people



Malcolm Campbell, photo with his dog Hoofus, does not have his own children, but he has devoted most of his life to ...

Joseph Johnson / Stuff

Malcolm Campbell, photo with his dog Hoofus, does not have his own children, but he devoted most of his life to caring for children in need.

Malcolm Campbell does not have his own children, but he is a father figure for a number of children who grow up without loving parents.

The Christchurch caretaker, whose personal mantra is "all children need a second chance", has given transitional care as a foster parent to children in need who need about 10 years.

Campbell has taken care of more than 15 children and helped raise a cousin and nephew when they went through a difficult time.

Malcolm Campbell's house has become a refugee for children of rough upbringing.

Joseph Johnson / Stuff

Malcolm Campbell's house has become a refugee for children of rough upbringing.

The main task of Campbell is to care for children who enter full-time foster families. His house has become a refuge for children in difficult situations.

READ MORE:
* Oranga Tamariki boss to investigate lack of support for caretaker
* Tribute to your father's day: I would not be the woman I am without you, Dad
* Five things that have to do with father this Father's Day

"Usually my house is full of children during the weekends," he said.

Besides the fact that children stay with him for about four months in a row, the 46-year-old also works full-time tutoring to young people in a Canterbury development program.

Working with and caring for children was part of his daily routine.

"It has almost become like a passion for life."

Campbell said that some children were badly damaged by heavy education.

"I do not see the child for the child's behavior, I think that's very important."

"As generations change, we have to understand what is going on there and what is going on with the young people."

Campbell said he would like to take the kids on walks, let them play with his dog Hoofus and learn life skills such as cooking.

He took them out to do things and taught them that life was not just about money, he said.

Learning practical skills was a way to pass on knowledge so that they could do the same for the next generation, Campbell said.

"[I’m] teach these children practical skills in the hope that they will reduce their costs later in life. "

He said that parents often got entangled in the time they spent with their children. Quality time was important, he said.

Campbell believed that children responded best when the parent or caregiver was listening, talking, and spending time with them.

"Children simply need someone who supports them and is there for them.

"Nothing I do pays me well, I do it for passion, I do it for love and I do it because I want something better for our children."

Caregiver Support manager Nicola Hastie said that Campbell was an "incredible" carer who provided "great" care.

"He often cares about some of our people who have complex needs and who come from a number of complex situations.

"He is dedicated to the children and has a real passion for what he does."

Hastie said that Campbell's care was "incredibly important" and "everything was for them".

"It has a huge impact on their lives, they can trust again and know that they have someone there who cares for them and trusts them."

She hoped others would be inspired to follow in Campbell's footsteps.

"I hope that the story of Malcolm opens the door for others, because these children are part of our community and we just want the best for them."

Anyone interested in a caregiver should contact Oranga Tamariki, the children's ministry, she said.

– Stuff


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Devoted caretaker has become a father figure for many people



Malcolm Campbell, photo with his dog Hoofus, does not have his own children, but he has devoted most of his life to ...

Joseph Johnson / Stuff

Malcolm Campbell, photo with his dog Hoofus, does not have his own children, but he devoted most of his life to caring for children in need.

Malcolm Campbell does not have his own children, but he is a father figure for a number of children who grow up without loving parents.

The Christchurch caretaker, whose personal mantra is "all children need a second chance", has given transitional care as a foster parent to children in need who need about 10 years.

Campbell has taken care of more than 15 children and helped raise a cousin and nephew when they went through a difficult time.

Malcolm Campbell's house has become a refugee for children of rough upbringing.

Joseph Johnson / Stuff

Malcolm Campbell's house has become a refugee for children of rough upbringing.

The main task of Campbell is to care for children who enter full-time foster families. His house has become a refuge for children in difficult situations.

READ MORE:
* Oranga Tamariki boss to investigate lack of support for caretaker
* Tribute to your father's day: I would not be the woman I am without you, Dad
* Five things that have to do with father this Father's Day

"Usually my house is full of children during the weekends," he said.

Besides the fact that children stay with him for about four months in a row, the 46-year-old also works full-time tutoring to young people in a Canterbury development program.

Working with and caring for children was part of his daily routine.

"It has almost become like a passion for life."

Campbell said that some children were badly damaged by heavy education.

"I do not see the child for the child's behavior, I think that's very important."

"As generations change, we have to understand what is going on there and what is going on with the young people."

Campbell said he would like to take the kids on walks, let them play with his dog Hoofus and learn life skills such as cooking.

He took them out to do things and taught them that life was not just about money, he said.

Learning practical skills was a way to pass on knowledge so that they could do the same for the next generation, Campbell said.

"[I’m] teach these children practical skills in the hope that they will reduce their costs later in life. "

He said that parents often got entangled in the time they spent with their children. Quality time was important, he said.

Campbell believed that children responded best when the parent or caregiver was listening, talking, and spending time with them.

"Children simply need someone who supports them and is there for them.

"Nothing I do pays me well, I do it for passion, I do it for love and I do it because I want something better for our children."

Caregiver Support manager Nicola Hastie said that Campbell was an "incredible" carer who provided "great" care.

"He often cares about some of our people who have complex needs and who come from a number of complex situations.

"He is dedicated to the children and has a real passion for what he does."

Hastie said that Campbell's care was "incredibly important" and "everything was for them".

"It has a huge impact on their lives, they can trust again and know that they have someone there who cares for them and trusts them."

She hoped others would be inspired to follow in Campbell's footsteps.

"I hope that the story of Malcolm opens the door for others, because these children are part of our community and we just want the best for them."

Anyone interested in a caregiver should contact Oranga Tamariki, the children's ministry, she said.

– Stuff


Source link

Devoted caretaker has become a father figure for many people



Malcolm Campbell, photo with his dog Hoofus, does not have his own children, but he has devoted most of his life to ...

Joseph Johnson / Stuff

Malcolm Campbell, photo with his dog Hoofus, does not have his own children, but he devoted most of his life to caring for children in need.

Malcolm Campbell does not have his own children, but he is a father figure for a number of children who grow up without loving parents.

The Christchurch caretaker, whose personal mantra is "all children need a second chance", has given transitional care as a foster parent to children in need who need about 10 years.

Campbell has taken care of more than 15 children and helped raise a cousin and nephew when they went through a difficult time.

Malcolm Campbell's house has become a refugee for children of rough upbringing.

Joseph Johnson / Stuff

Malcolm Campbell's house has become a refugee for children of rough upbringing.

The main task of Campbell is to care for children who enter full-time foster families. His house has become a refuge for children in difficult situations.

READ MORE:
* Oranga Tamariki boss to investigate lack of support for caretaker
* Tribute to your father's day: I would not be the woman I am without you, Dad
* Five things that have to do with father this Father's Day

"Usually my house is full of children during the weekends," he said.

Besides the fact that children stay with him for about four months in a row, the 46-year-old also works full-time tutoring to young people in a Canterbury development program.

Working with and caring for children was part of his daily routine.

"It has almost become like a passion for life."

Campbell said that some children were badly damaged by heavy education.

"I do not see the child for the child's behavior, I think that's very important."

"As generations change, we have to understand what is going on there and what is going on with the young people."

Campbell said he would like to take the kids on walks, let them play with his dog Hoofus and learn life skills such as cooking.

He took them out to do things and taught them that life was not just about money, he said.

Learning practical skills was a way to pass on knowledge so that they could do the same for the next generation, Campbell said.

"[I’m] teach these children practical skills in the hope that they will reduce their costs later in life. "

He said that parents often got entangled in the time they spent with their children. Quality time was important, he said.

Campbell believed that children responded best when the parent or caregiver was listening, talking, and spending time with them.

"Children simply need someone who supports them and is there for them.

"Nothing I do pays me well, I do it for passion, I do it for love and I do it because I want something better for our children."

Caregiver Support manager Nicola Hastie said that Campbell was an "incredible" carer who provided "great" care.

"He often cares about some of our people who have complex needs and who come from a number of complex situations.

"He is dedicated to the children and has a real passion for what he does."

Hastie said that Campbell's care was "incredibly important" and "everything was for them".

"It has a huge impact on their lives, they can trust again and know that they have someone there who cares for them and trusts them."

She hoped others would be inspired to follow in Campbell's footsteps.

"I hope that the story of Malcolm opens the door for others, because these children are part of our community and we just want the best for them."

Anyone interested in a caregiver should contact Oranga Tamariki, the children's ministry, she said.

– Stuff


Source link

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