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Builds nests of waste: – Clean deadly traps



The "bird island" is called the small island of Runde, which is located on the outer edge of the ocean in Herøy on Sunnmøre. In the breeding season, from February to August, the island hosts more than 500,000 birds – including puffins, sea soles, storks and top shrubs.

Nature photographer Roger Brendhagen has visited and photographed the island and its feathered residents for almost ten years – and this year is no exception. He spent the last week on land as well as in a boat outside of Runde and photographed the island's famous bird cliffs.

But this year was not a pleasant experience for the photographer.

– The worst thing this week was when I returned to the cottage in the evening and studied the photos. I was completely disabled, almost crying. I have never seen anything so bad, Brendhagen tells Dagbladet.

NATURE PHOTOGRAPHER: Roger Brendhagen has been working as a nature photographer for 20 years and says that a lot has changed in nature at that time. Photo: private
Nature photographer: Roger Brendhagen has been working as a nature photographer for 20 years and says that a lot has changed in nature at that time. Photo: private
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Falling dead

For the birds, the birds no longer look the way they should, he says.

"They should have been built from seaweed and kelp, but instead full of trash, garnet remains, rope bumps, plastic and shit – and even other dead birds," Brendhagen says and explains:

– The nest, which should be a safe haven for these birds, has become a deadly trap. I have seen a nest where there were three generations of dead birds on top of each other. They were all trapped in grenades and died. I have also seen several birds that have been dead or half dead on the surface of the sea. They broke the wing after being stuck and panicking.

WANT THE REALITY SHOWS: Photographer Brendhagen says he will make visible what is happening in nature, what is no longer so beautiful - I want to pass on fact-based knowledge through photos, he says. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
WILL SHOW THE REALITY: Photographer Brendhagen says he will emphasize what is happening in nature, which is no longer so beautiful – I want to pass on fact-based knowledge through photos, he says. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
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The same litter

The Vogelberg is the southernmost in Norway and the most species-rich seabird location in Scandinavia. Martin Eggen, nature conservation adviser in the Norwegian Ornithological Society, visited the island itself. He says it is primarily the seal that originally built its nest with seaweed, but now litter of litter.

– The seagull is based on its nest every year, and they usually use the same nest as the year before that they freshen up with fresh material, says Eggen to Dagbladet.

– Why do they build the nests from plastic and yarn residues?

– It has become very easily accessible to them, but they may have discovered that it is a good and strong material.

REIR: The bird owl has built nests of yarn, plastic and waste on the island of Runde on Sunnmøre. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
nest: The bird owl has nests of yarn, plastic and waste built on the island of Runde on Sunnmøre. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
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risk

According to Eggen, it was more than ten years ago that you first saw plastic and waste in the fathers of Runde.

– The new thing is that there is still more and more. It is piling up. Approximately 90 percent of the plastic that enters the sea sinks to the seabed. The remaining ten percent is distributed on the surface and on the beaches. The plastic is not known to be broken down, so these images of the bird animals are a visual image of what is happening in our nature, he says.

For the birds, the plastic brings various risks:

– It's dangerous when they eat it, and many of the birds do it. It can make them sick, cause internal injuries, constipation – and in the worst case they can die. Moreover, they can get stuck in plastic, for example in yarn, he says.

The egg thinks the island of Runde is not unique in terms of how plastic poses a major threat to seabirds:

ILLE: - I was completely disabled, almost crying. I have never seen anything so bad, says nature photographer Roger Brendhagen to Dagbladet. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
MARSEILLE: – I was completely disabled, almost crying. I have never seen anything so bad, says nature photographer Roger Brendhagen to Dagbladet. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
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– We see the same in Finnmark and along the entire coast where the birds have settled. The plastic is now completely gone, he says.

He continues:

– This problem is growing above our heads and I am very concerned about the development. We are reducing plastic consumption as quickly as possible, there is a clear need for immediate measures.

– Knot in the stomach

Roger Brendhagen has been working as a nature photographer for 20 years. At the start of his career, he focused on photographing beautiful nature or exotic animals, but this has changed, he says.

– I now want to make visible what is happening in nature, which is no longer so beautiful, and I will pass on knowledge-based knowledge through photos – for example photos & # 39; s that nature & # 39; before and after & # 39; show.

WORSHIPS: More than 500,000 birds - including puffins, porcupine, storjo and top shrubs nest on Runde every year. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
NESTS: More than 500,000 birds nest on Runde every year, such as puffins, porcupine, storjo and top shrubs. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
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– What I constantly see through my job makes me both angry and anxious. It gives me a lump in my stomach and that's why I spend more time showing what it's like. And for me it's very important to show this to those who haven't thought about it that often, he continues and adds:

– At the same time, it is important to emphasize that many Norwegians are good at sorting at the source and that very few dumps into the sea. Yet there are some who destroy too much, he says.

NON-CASH: Researchers can finally find the solution why birds often fly in V-formation. Video: The Royal Veterinary College Show more Show more
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signal

Signe Christensen-Dalsgaard, who works as a bird researcher at NINA in Trondheim, also visited the island of Runde. She tells Dagbladet that in various places in the world you can see that the mosquito is now replacing seaweed and taring with plastic, yarn residues and waste in their nests.

"They breed a lot on the British Isles, and it is known that there is a lot of nest in the nest," she says.

– The biggest risk that this entails for the birds is that they can get involved in the waste, says Christensen-Dalsgaard, who says he is concerned about the development:

– The amount of waste and plastic that we see on the coast is extremely worrying. Some birds get stuck in the garbage, others confuse it with food and eat it. These are signs of how the marine environment is doing nowadays.

– Terribly sad

Marine biologist and senior consultant for WWF World Nature Fund responds to the photos from Runde:

– These are terrible photos that unfortunately occur more often. We mainly see that seabirds build their nest from more and more plastic. The sea soles here have used what they find in nature and find more and more plastic waste on the beaches, where they would catch seaweed and kelp to build their nests.

CONFIDENCE: Marine biologist and senior consultant for WWF World Natural Fund respond to Runde's photos.
SAD: Marine biologist and senior consultant for WWF World Nature Fund responds to the photos from Runde.
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He further states that WWF requires plastic producers to be given considerably more responsibility for the plastic that they produce.

– To stop plastic spillage from the sea, we must impose a much stricter producer responsibility on all plastic manufacturers. If you are allowed to produce plastic, you must also ensure that you know the correct use and disposal of the plastic that you have produced. Manufacturers must also be responsible for developing environmentally-friendly waste management, where this is not present to a large extent. This, among other things, by ensuring that the plastic gets a greater value by introducing many more mortgage systems, Myhre says.

Extremely vulnerable

The nature reserves in Runde are described as vulnerable, important and interesting for research.

And according to the website Millionstate.no, seabirds are a particularly vulnerable group of animals when it comes to plastic in the sea.

– Birds in search of food use a lot of energy and it is important to bring food home during the breeding season. Taking the bird with waste back to the nest, this will undoubtedly have a negative effect on the development of the youth. This worries us because we know that several of our seabird populations are decaying.

SØPPELØYA: It floats with plastic and waste on the Midway Islands. Video: CNN Show more
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NEW UN report

In the afternoon, the UN Nature Committee IPBES (Intergovernmental Platform on biodiversity and ecosystem services) presented the report, which outlines the nature of nature and the consequences for people's livelihoods.

The first main panel of the Nature Panel paints a bleak picture of development and concludes that the exploitation of nature by people is increasingly at the expense of nature's ability to provide us with food, energy and materials in the future.

Death Field: Brendghagen describes the nest as pure deaths. - The birds are stuck in nets, ropes and trash, he says. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
DEATH TRAP: Brendghagen describes the nest as pure death. – The birds are stuck in nets, ropes and trash, he says. Photo: Roger Brendhagen
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One million of an estimated eight million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction. It is more than at any point in human history, according to the report.

These are threatened:

  • More than 40 percent of the amphibian species
  • Almost 33 percent of the corals
  • More than 33 percent of all marine mammals
  • About 10 percent of all insect species

According to the UN panel, it has gone so far that it is impossible to achieve the UN sustainability goals and the international Aichi biodiversity goals by 2020.

"The overwhelming evidence in the report of different knowledge areas draws an ominous picture," says IPBES leader Sir Robert Watson.

– The state of the ecosystems on which we and other species rely is increasing faster than ever. We are destroying the foundations of the economy, our livelihood, food safety, health and quality of life worldwide, he continues.

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