Allow a videoconference for De Lima in ICC case



To prove that her motion to appear in person during oral discussions is not a ruse to escape detention, senator Leila De Lima is willing to argue during detention by means of a live video. and / or audiofeed & # 39;

Published at 2.46 pm, 24 August 2018

Updated at 8:48 pm, 24 August 2018

VIDEOCONFERENCE. Minority senators ask the Supreme Court to allow detained Senator Leila de Lima to take part in the oral arguments through video or audio technology. File Photo by DARREN LANGIT

VIDEOCONFERENCE. Minority senators ask the Supreme Court to allow detained Senator Leila de Lima to take part in the oral arguments through video or audio technology. File Photo by DARREN LANGIT

MANILA, PHILIPPINES – Minority senators asked the Supreme Court (SC) to allow detained Senator Leila de Lima to use video and audio conferences to take part in the oral arguments about the withdrawal of the country from the International Criminal Court ( ICC).

The minority block – Senate leader of the minorities, Franklin Drilon, senators Francis Pangilinan, Antonio Trillanes IV, De Lima, and Risa Hontiveros – filed a motion on 23 August for reconsideration before the Supreme Court. Senator Paolo Benigno Aquino IV, who no longer has the land, agreed with the motion.

This appeal was submitted in response to the SC decision of 7 August, in which De Lima's request to participate in the oral observations of 28 August was refused. (READ: Still playing the cards? Politics of ICC oral arguments)

"To show the honorable Member that the motion of Senator De Lima to appear in person during oral pleadings is not a trick to escape from detention, Senator De Lima is prepared to use a live video and / or audio feed during his detention. argue ", according to the motion. .

"This raises the Honorable Member's apparent concerns about the current detention of Senator De Lima, where necessary petitioner senators can provide the necessary equipment and facilities for this to take place," it added.

The allies of De Lima said that "the right to speak for himself in his own case is a fundamental right" protected by the 1987 Constitution.

"The exercise of a constitutional right is fundamental in our democracy, and it is not the burden of Senator De Lima to show why there is a" compelling reason "to exercise a right granted by the constitution" according to the senators.

"It would be high or ironic to ban Senator De Lima to argue about a constitutional issue of the greatest national interest, given that the Honorable Member has given leave to persons charged with uncontested crimes," said she also, referring to the leave granted to former President Gloria Arroyo and Zaldy Ampatuan.

De Lima filed a separate appeal on 16 August, but on Friday, 24 August, the High Court rejected it. – Rappler.com


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Allow a videoconference for De Lima in ICC case



To prove that her motion to appear in person during oral discussions is not a ruse to escape detention, senator Leila De Lima is willing to argue during detention by means of a live video. and / or audiofeed & # 39;

Published at 2.46 pm, 24 August 2018

Updated at 8:48 pm, 24 August 2018

VIDEOCONFERENCE. Minority senators ask the Supreme Court to allow detained Senator Leila de Lima to take part in the oral arguments through video or audio technology. File Photo by DARREN LANGIT

VIDEOCONFERENCE. Minority senators ask the Supreme Court to allow detained Senator Leila de Lima to take part in the oral arguments through video or audio technology. File Photo by DARREN LANGIT

MANILA, PHILIPPINES – Minority senators asked the Supreme Court (SC) to allow detained Senator Leila de Lima to use video and audio conferences to take part in the oral arguments about the withdrawal of the country from the International Criminal Court ( ICC).

The minority block – Senate leader of the minorities, Franklin Drilon, senators Francis Pangilinan, Antonio Trillanes IV, De Lima, and Risa Hontiveros – filed a motion on 23 August for reconsideration before the Supreme Court. Senator Paolo Benigno Aquino IV, who no longer has the land, agreed with the motion.

This appeal was submitted in response to the SC decision of 7 August, in which De Lima's request to participate in the oral observations of 28 August was refused. (READ: Still playing the cards? Politics of ICC oral arguments)

"To show the honorable Member that the motion of Senator De Lima to appear in person during oral pleadings is not a trick to escape from detention, Senator De Lima is prepared to use a live video and / or audio feed during his detention. argue ", according to the motion. .

"This raises the Honorable Member's apparent concerns about the current detention of Senator De Lima, where necessary petitioner senators can provide the necessary equipment and facilities for this to take place," it added.

The allies of De Lima said that "the right to speak for himself in his own case is a fundamental right" protected by the 1987 Constitution.

"The exercise of a constitutional right is fundamental in our democracy, and it is not the burden of Senator De Lima to show why there is a" compelling reason "to exercise a right granted by the constitution" according to the senators.

"It would be high or ironic to ban Senator De Lima to argue about a constitutional issue of the greatest national interest, given that the Honorable Member has given leave to persons charged with uncontested crimes," said she also, referring to the leave granted to former President Gloria Arroyo and Zaldy Ampatuan.

De Lima filed a separate appeal on 16 August, but on Friday, 24 August, the High Court rejected it. – Rappler.com


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