CAAP: Xiamen Air black box for shipping abroad



CAAP: Xiamen Air black box for shipping abroad

Rudy Santos (The Philippine Star) – August 23, 2018 – 00:00

MANILA, PHILIPPINES – The black box and flight data recorder of the Xiamen Air airliner that occurred last week in an accident at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport would be brought to Japan or Singapore for investigation, the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP)) said.

CAAP spokesperson Eric Apolonio said that while they prefer to have the two equipment checked in Singapore, which is closer, the procedure might take longer because the city state is flooded with such requests.

"There are two choices where the black box and the flight recorder are brought to Singapore or Japan," said Apolonio. In Singapore, a request for investigation is facilitated on the basis of "first come, first served" because there are many such requests. In Japan, the & # 39; line is shorter & # 39 ;, he added.

He also said that aircraft researchers were visiting the site where the Air Xiamen flight MF8667 ended after the runway had ended at the landing last August 16 during bad weather. Although nobody was injured during the accident, it paralyzed operations at NAIA for 36 hours. A source at the CAAP said that the pilot on the basis of the first investigation claimed that he was temporarily blinded by heavy rain.

But the same source said that a recording of the conversation between the air traffic controller and the pilots did not indicate an emergency message or something unusual. The accident took place at 11:55. or minutes after their last conversation at 11.30 am.

"All technical details coded on the flight data recorder help to analyze the condition of the Boeing 737 plane when we take it to Singapore or Japan, while the pilot and crew statement is vital to determine the human factor, "said Apolonio. .

The pilots and crew of the Xiamen flight are still being investigated by the CAAP council of researchers. Drug and alcohol tests for the pilots produced negative results.

"They can only leave after questioning by our researchers from the Aircraft Accident Investigation and Inquiry Board (AAIIB)," said Apolonio.

It is unlikely that the amount that Xiamen Air will have to pay to the government will be half a billion pesos, according to the Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA).

MIAA managing director Ed Monreal said that MIAA is still assessing costs and damages as a result of the Xiamen incident.

Monreal said Tuesday that the first calculations have shown that Xiamen will have to pay P15 million for manpower, as well as the rental costs of the crane and other equipment used to remove the aircraft from the runway.

However, Monreal emphasized that he does not expect the amount to be higher than P500 million.

Airlines can in turn file separate cases against Xiamen Air to recover their own losses as a result of the accident.

Monreal also said that there is a need for the construction of a new airport with two main avenues.

"The best basic solution is to build an airport with at least two parallel runways, but these runways must be far apart, we have to consider safety, if there is an incident like this that affects the main course, there will be another or alternative runway that we can use, "he said.

CAAP in 2014 called for the construction of a parallel runway at the NAIA in an attempt to reduce congestion at the airport.

Former CAAP Deputy Director General Capt. John Andrews said that the construction of a parallel runway at NAIA could increase the capacity of the airport from 40 to about 60 aircraft movements per hour. The planned runway would be built south of the existing runway 08/24 in the NAIA complex of 400 hectares.

NAIA was built in 1981 with two intersecting tracks – the primary runway 06/24 and the secondary runway 13/31. To limit air traffic to 40 slots per hour, the CAAP has transferred general aviation flights to Sangley Airport in Cavite. The plan of NAIA improvements to the runway has not, however, been implemented.

Several flights including PAL, Cebu Pacific and other airlines have been canceled, diverted or delayed after the Xiamen accident.

"The weekend closure of the main Philippine capital airport due to a stalled Xiamen Airlines jet was an eye-opener for authorities to improve protocols," said Tourism Secretary Bernadette Romulo-Puyat in a television interview Wednesday.

She said the country was "on schedule" to meet its tourist arrival targets due to the recent upgrade of airport terminals, including the New Mactan-Cebu Airport. The Philippines is aiming for 7.4 million visitors this year and 12 million in 2022. – With Richmond Mercurio


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CAAP: Xiamen Air black box for shipping abroad



CAAP: Xiamen Air black box for shipping abroad

Rudy Santos (The Philippine Star) – August 23, 2018 – 00:00

MANILA, PHILIPPINES – The black box and flight data recorder of the Xiamen Air airliner that occurred last week in an accident at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport would be brought to Japan or Singapore for investigation, the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP)) said.

CAAP spokesperson Eric Apolonio said that while they prefer to have the two equipment checked in Singapore, which is closer, the procedure might take longer because the city state is flooded with such requests.

"There are two choices where the black box and the flight recorder are brought to Singapore or Japan," said Apolonio. In Singapore, a request for investigation is facilitated on the basis of "first come, first served" because there are many such requests. In Japan, the & # 39; line is shorter & # 39 ;, he added.

He also said that aircraft researchers were visiting the site where the Air Xiamen flight MF8667 ended after the runway had ended at the landing last August 16 during bad weather. Although nobody was injured during the accident, it paralyzed operations at NAIA for 36 hours. A source at the CAAP said that the pilot on the basis of the first investigation claimed that he was temporarily blinded by heavy rain.

But the same source said that a recording of the conversation between the air traffic controller and the pilots did not indicate an emergency message or something unusual. The accident took place at 11:55. or minutes after their last conversation at 11.30 am.

"All technical details coded on the flight data recorder help to analyze the condition of the Boeing 737 plane when we take it to Singapore or Japan, while the pilot and crew statement is vital to determine the human factor, "said Apolonio. .

The pilots and crew of the Xiamen flight are still being investigated by the CAAP council of researchers. Drug and alcohol tests for the pilots produced negative results.

"They can only leave after questioning by our researchers from the Aircraft Accident Investigation and Inquiry Board (AAIIB)," said Apolonio.

It is unlikely that the amount that Xiamen Air will have to pay to the government will be half a billion pesos, according to the Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA).

MIAA managing director Ed Monreal said that MIAA is still assessing costs and damages as a result of the Xiamen incident.

Monreal said Tuesday that the first calculations have shown that Xiamen will have to pay P15 million for manpower, as well as the rental costs of the crane and other equipment used to remove the aircraft from the runway.

However, Monreal emphasized that he does not expect the amount to be higher than P500 million.

Airlines can in turn file separate cases against Xiamen Air to recover their own losses as a result of the accident.

Monreal also said that there is a need for the construction of a new airport with two main avenues.

"The best basic solution is to build an airport with at least two parallel runways, but these runways must be far apart, we have to consider safety, if there is an incident like this that affects the main course, there will be another or alternative runway that we can use, "he said.

CAAP in 2014 called for the construction of a parallel runway at the NAIA in an attempt to reduce congestion at the airport.

Former CAAP Deputy Director General Capt. John Andrews said that the construction of a parallel runway at NAIA could increase the capacity of the airport from 40 to about 60 aircraft movements per hour. The planned runway would be built south of the existing runway 08/24 in the NAIA complex of 400 hectares.

NAIA was built in 1981 with two intersecting tracks – the primary runway 06/24 and the secondary runway 13/31. To limit air traffic to 40 slots per hour, the CAAP has transferred general aviation flights to Sangley Airport in Cavite. The plan of NAIA improvements to the runway has not, however, been implemented.

Several flights including PAL, Cebu Pacific and other airlines have been canceled, diverted or delayed after the Xiamen accident.

"The weekend closure of the main Philippine capital airport due to a stalled Xiamen Airlines jet was an eye-opener for authorities to improve protocols," said Tourism Secretary Bernadette Romulo-Puyat in a television interview Wednesday.

She said the country was "on schedule" to meet its tourist arrival targets due to the recent upgrade of airport terminals, including the New Mactan-Cebu Airport. The Philippines is aiming for 7.4 million visitors this year and 12 million in 2022. – With Richmond Mercurio


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