The Tunisian is a friend of Maradona and is not the only … famous mistakes made by Arab referees in the World Cup



The death of the Argentine legend Maradona shed light on the Arab referee, who counted one of his main goals for him during his sports career.

Maradona died of a heart attack at the age of 60 on Wednesday after undergoing surgery at the beginning of this month to remove a hematoma in his brain.

While Maradona viewed Tunisian Ali bin Nasser’s decision as a divine gift, others viewed it as a football disaster, and Bennacer wasn’t the only Arab to make a controversial decision in major international matches, there were those who followed him.

Tunisian Ali Bin Nasser, “The Eternal Friend”

Bennacer was the referee of the 1986 World Cup quarter finals in Mexico between Argentina and England, in which Argentina won by two goals to one after the Tunisian referee declared an illegal goal for Maradona.

The illegal goal was scored by Maradona with his own hand, and when later asked about it, he replied with his famous phrase, “It was not my hand, but the hand of God.”

In fact, the honor is partly due to Bennacer, who failed to notice Maradona’s hand when it hit the ball towards goal, and told the media after the game that he did not see Maradona’s hand touching the ball.

At Maradona he visited the Arab referee, who counted his goal in hand

Bennacer was the referee of the 1986 World Cup quarter-final in Mexico between Argentina and England, in which Argentina won by two goals to one, after the Tunisian referee ruled an illegal goal for Maradona.

While Maradona described Ben Nasser as his “eternal friend” thanks to this goal, the Tunisian ruling was subject to severe criticism, leading to his failure to participate in another World Cup.

The revenge of the Spanish public against the Egyptian Gamal Al-Ghandour

Egyptian referee Gamal Al-Ghandour with Spanish coach Camacho

Egyptian referee Gamal Al-Ghandour with Spanish coach Jose Camacho

Egyptian referee Gamal Al-Ghandour was a major reason for Spain’s loss to South Korea at the 2002 World Cup, which was held in South Korea and Japan.

The match ended in South Korea’s favor with a penalty shootout and Spain left the World Cup in the quarter-finals, thanks to Al-Ghandour’s decision.

Al-Ghandour canceled a correct goal for Spain, claiming the ball went outside the goal line before reaching goalscorer Moriantes, based on a banner from the assistant referee, but television footage afterward revealed that the standard bearer had committed a foul.

This match is still in the minds of Spanish fans, and the media continues to mention the disastrous match on several occasions.

The Egyptian Essam Abdel-Fattah and the Goal of Achieving the Result

Egyptian arbitrator Essam Abdel Fattah

Egyptian arbitrator Essam Abdel Fattah

At the 2006 World Cup in Germany, Egyptian Essam Abdel Fattah managed to beat the Australia-Japan match in the first round, and while his mistake didn’t lead to disaster, he was a sponsor after being invited to participate in subsequent World Cups.

Abdel Fattah scored a goal for Japan despite a foul, but the game ended when the Australian national team won 3-1.

After the game, Abdel-Fattah said in a personal conversation with Australian goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer that the goal did not change the course of the game or the end result, adding that everyone is making the mistake.

When Schwarzer revealed the content of the dialogue between him and Abdel Fattah to the media, the Egyptian referee denied apologies to the goalkeeper and stressed the correctness of the Japanese goal.




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