Lower PMD speeds, mandatory helmet use with new expert panel recommendations, Transport news & Top stories



SINGAPORE – Cutting speeds on footpaths of up to 10 kmh for personal mobility devices (PMDs) and cycling, and the mandatory wearing of a helmet for cyclists on the road are some recommendations to ensure the safety of cyclists, PMD users and pedestrians.

The Active Mobility Advice Platform, which for the first time established rules on the safe use of paths by cyclists and PMD users two years ago, has once again presented a series of recommendations to the government.

The chairman of the panel, associate professor Muhammad Faishal Ibrahim, said in a Facebook post on Friday (24 August) that one of the recommendations is to reduce the speed limit for PMDs and bicycles on footpaths to 10 kmh, now even less than 15 km.

This allows riders to get more response time to prevent accidents and help reduce the severity of injuries in an accident, Dr. said. Faishal, who is also the Senior Secretary of State for Education and Social and Family Development.

Another recommendation is to give personal mobility aids, such as mobility scooters and motorized wheelchairs, a maximum speed of no more than 10 km, to "ensure their use for people with real mobility challenges". There is currently no limit to their top speed, although they have to keep on 15km pedestrian roads.

The use of helmets for cyclists on the road, as well as requiring cyclists and PMD users to stop and search for oncoming traffic, will also be made compulsory if the recommendations are approved.

In his report, the panel said that although it strongly encouraged riders to take out personal and civil liability insurance, it did not recommend to make such insurance mandatory at this time.

"This recommendation was made after extensive public consultation," Dr Faishal noted.

They include a survey of more than 6,000 people and also feedback from about 100 participants, who cycled different ways on different roads and reason, about how current rules can be improved based on their experiences.

On the basis of the survey, 77 percent of respondents supported a reduction of the existing speed limit of 15 kmh on footpaths, with 35 percent feeling that it should be at 8 km / h and 19 percent think it should be 10 km.

Regarding the behavior of cyclists and PMD users at road crossings, 39 percent found that riders had to get off and push, while 60% felt that drivers had to stop or slow down before they looked outside.

Most respondents felt that helmets should be mandatory for cyclists on the road, with 77 percent as support.

Discussions were also held with players from the business community and about 100 members of the public.

In the report, the panel said: "As the landscape evolves and mature, the panel will continue to monitor the situation to assess whether further regulatory refinements are needed to support the acceptance of active mobility in a safe, responsible and sustainable environment. way. "

The Ministry of Transport said on Friday that it will study the recommendations of the panel and will give its response in due time.


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Lower PMD speeds, mandatory helmet use with new expert panel recommendations, Transport news & Top stories



SINGAPORE – Cutting speeds on footpaths of up to 10 kmh for personal mobility devices (PMDs) and cycling, and the mandatory wearing of a helmet for cyclists on the road are some recommendations to ensure the safety of cyclists, PMD users and pedestrians.

The Active Mobility Advice Platform, which for the first time established rules on the safe use of paths by cyclists and PMD users two years ago, has once again presented a series of recommendations to the government.

The chairman of the panel, associate professor Muhammad Faishal Ibrahim, said in a Facebook post on Friday (24 August) that one of the recommendations is to reduce the speed limit for PMDs and bicycles on footpaths to 10 kmh, now even less than 15 km.

This allows riders to get more response time to prevent accidents and help reduce the severity of injuries in an accident, Dr. said. Faishal, who is also the Senior Secretary of State for Education and Social and Family Development.

Another recommendation is to give personal mobility aids, such as mobility scooters and motorized wheelchairs, a maximum speed of no more than 10 km, to "ensure their use for people with real mobility challenges". There is currently no limit to their top speed, although they have to keep on 15km pedestrian roads.

The use of helmets for cyclists on the road, as well as requiring cyclists and PMD users to stop and search for oncoming traffic, will also be made compulsory if the recommendations are approved.

In his report, the panel said that although it strongly encouraged riders to take out personal and civil liability insurance, it did not recommend to make such insurance mandatory at this time.

"This recommendation was made after extensive public consultation," Dr Faishal noted.

They include a survey of more than 6,000 people and also feedback from about 100 participants, who cycled different ways on different roads and reason, about how current rules can be improved based on their experiences.

On the basis of the survey, 77 percent of respondents supported a reduction of the existing speed limit of 15 kmh on footpaths, with 35 percent feeling that it should be at 8 km / h and 19 percent think it should be 10 km.

Regarding the behavior of cyclists and PMD users at road crossings, 39 percent found that riders had to get off and push, while 60% felt that drivers had to stop or slow down before they looked outside.

Most respondents felt that helmets should be mandatory for cyclists on the road, with 77 percent as support.

Discussions were also held with players from the business community and about 100 members of the public.

In the report, the panel said: "As the landscape evolves and mature, the panel will continue to monitor the situation to assess whether further regulatory refinements are needed to support the acceptance of active mobility in a safe, responsible and sustainable environment. way. "

The Ministry of Transport said on Friday that it will study the recommendations of the panel and will give its response in due time.


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