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A girl who has become a symbol of the Yemeni crisis has died



Amal Hussein, 7, whose photo became the symbol of the worst humanitarian crisis in the world and the bloody civil war that ravaged Yemen on 26 October, died. She suffered from severe acute malnutrition.

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7-year-old girl from Yemen, Amal Hussein, the photo of which is published in The New York Times, has become the symbol of the biggest humanitarian crisis in the world, has died. The news was confirmed by the Yemeni Ministry of Health. She died on October 26. & # 160;

This is a photo of a famous photographer Tyler Hicks, which was admitted to the Unicef ​​clinic in Aslan on 18 October. It shows a malnourished, fired little girl & # 8211; an image that illustrates the millions of Yemeni children who are starving daily because of the brutal war in Yemen. Only a few days after the photo was published, Amal was dead. Hicks is with a journalist & # 160;Declan Walsham research into the impact of the three-year war on the Yemeni population. & # 160;

& # 34; She was a little girl who was just the same. Her mother was with her. She told us that refugees come from the second part of the country. Their house was additionally bombed in Saada borders with Saudi Arabia, & # 34; is for Euronews Walsh said. The company could not afford to eat food. In addition to malnutrition, Amal also suffered from severe diarrhea and vomiting. But in the sick woman, 144 kilometers from the capital, Sana, there was no room for Amal and they could not afford to travel to another place. That is why it was returned to refugee camps & # 353; & # 269; e. & # 160;

Her story has become a symbol that Walsh calls Yemeni A disaster caused by a man & # 34;. & # 160;

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7-year-old girl from Yemen, Amal Hussein, the photo of which is published in The New York Times, has become the symbol of the world's largest humanitarian crisis, has died. The news was confirmed by the Yemeni Ministry of Health. She died on October 26.

This is a photo of a famous photographer Tyler Hicks, which was admitted to the Unicef ​​clinic in Aslan on October 18th. She shows a malnourished, elaborate girl – an image that illustrates millions of Yemeni children who are starving daily because of the brutal war in Yemen. Only a few days after the photo was published, Amal was dead. Hicks is with a journalist Declan Walsham research into the impact of the three-year war on the Yemeni population.

"She was a little girl in peace, her mother was with her, told us they were refugees from another part of the country. Their house was bombed in Saada along the border with Saudi Arabia," is for EuronewsWalsh said. The family could not afford food. In addition to malnutrition, Amal also suffered from severe diarrhea and vomiting. But in the hospital, located 144 kilometers from the capital of Sana, there was no room for Amal and parents could not pay the way to bring them elsewhere. That's why her parents were taken back to the refugee camp.

Her story has become a symbol that Walsh calls Yemeni "man-made disaster".

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After the publication of the photo they are the US Secretary of Defense James Mattis and the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mike Pompeo called for a ceasefire within the next 30 days. But hunger and lack of Yemen is completely dark the murder of a Saudi journalist at the Consulate of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul.

For three years the "civil war in Yemen" has completely left the country and the largest humanitarian crisis in the world has collapsed. According to the latest figures, at least 10,000 people have died in the fighting between Saudi Arabia and the Guards rebels led by Saudi Arabia. There are frequent attacks on civilians, bombardment of marriages, funerals and coaches in the past, the world shook public.

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After the publication of the photo, the US Secretary of Defense James Mattis and the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mike Pompeocalled for a cease-fire in the "next 30 days". Hunger and scarcity in Yemen have completely overshadowed the murder of the Saudi journalist Hashokdhi in the consulate of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul.

The three-year civil war in Yemen completely destroyed the country and plunged it into the largest humanitarian crisis in the world. According to the latest figures, at least 10,000 people have died in the fighting between Saudi Arabia and the Guards rebels led by Saudi Arabia. Frequent attacks on civilians, bombing of marriages, funerals and school buses have been shaken by the world public in the past.

Lakota threatens more than seven million children.PHOTO: AP

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Partial blockades of the state 12 million people were on the verge of starvation, which some describe as the worst hunger in the past 100 years. "Economic warfare demanded the highest burden on the civilian population, and a coalition led by Saudi Arabia has introduced a series of punitive measures to undermine rebellious rebels controlling the northern provinces of the country, but these measures, including free blockades, import restrictions and refusal of payment, about one million officials, millions of people are immersed in review, pi & e; The New York Times.

The UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) warns that more than seven million children in Yemen are threatened with hunger, they will not even be able to end the long-standing conflict. Today, 1.8 million children, younger than five years old, have acute malnutrition and 400,000 are affected by acute malnutrition, & # 34; said the representative of the Regional Director of UNICEF, adding War & # 353; s Warning & # 353; s Is So Bad Condition & # 34; in the poorest countries of the Arab world. & # 160;

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The country's blockade by the country has put 12 million people on the brink of hunger, some of whom have been the worst famine in the last 100 years. It was the economic war that demanded the highest tax on the civilian population. A coalition headed by Saudi Arabia has introduced a number of stringent economic measures to undermine the rebels controlling the northern parts of the country. But these measures, including incidental blockades, import restrictions and the rejection of salaries of about one million government workers, have plunged millions into poverty, writes The New York Times.

The UN Children & # 39; s Fund (UNICEF) notes that more than seven million children in Yemen suffer from hunger, but that they can not end the long-standing conflict. "Today, 1.8 million children younger than five years are at risk of acute malnutrition, and 400,000 people have already been affected by acute malnutrition," said the representative of the Regional Director of UNICEF, adding "the war has aggravated all such bad conditions"in the poorest country of the Arab world.


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