Extend abortion pledges to Northern Irish women, Labor encourages government



The & draconian & # 39; Abortion legislation in Northern Ireland needs to be changed to give women access to medication that ends, as in the rest of the UK, Labor said.

Shadow Northern Ireland Secretary Tony Lloyd called on the government to take action after it was announced that the rules in England will be changed to enable women to take the second abortion pill at home.

The move ensures that the country follows Scotland and Wales by giving women the opportunity to take the pill in the safe and familiar environment of their own homes.

Insists that the abortion law in Northern Ireland is intensified after a referendum in the Republic of Ireland earlier this year with strong support for liberalization legislation south of the border.

The government must take action and bring the draconian laws of Northern Ireland into line with those in the rest of the UK

But Northern Ireland has not had a meeting since last year and the British government has so far urged Stormont to change.

Mr. Lloyd said the announcement in England emphasized the "shocking reality that women in Northern Ireland do not have the same access to the health care they need as in the rest of the UK".

He added, "Access to safe and legal terminations in Northern Ireland is strictly limited, resulting in women traveling to Britain for termination or taking non-regulated pills purchased online.

"Women in Northern Ireland who take these pills endanger their lives.

"The UK government must take action and bring the draconian laws of Northern Ireland into line with those in the rest of the UK to ensure that women do not suffer any further suffering and that those in need receive the care they need."

According to the current system, women in England must take both pills, mifepristone and misoprostol 24-48 hours in a clinic to terminate an early pre-pregnancy pregnancy of 10 weeks.

The government said it will legalize home use before the end of the year in a move welcomed by campaigners who say that the current system can cause unnecessary stress and trauma.

Women leave the clinic after taking the second pill and give the pregnancy at home, with the two visits sometimes challenging to organize and often uncomfortable or traumatic – and some women even start to fail before they come home.

In July, more than 170 politicians from around the spectrum in the United Kingdom and Ireland called on the British government to reform Northern Irish abortion legislation.

The group, including Conservative, Labor and Lib Dem MPs and peers, members of the Stormont Assembly and Irish TD & # 39; s and Senators, said it was about protecting women's human rights and respecting Good Friday -agreement.

According to the group, nearly 1,000 women and girls had to travel to Britain in 2017 for safe terminations, while others had to take illegal abortion medications at home.


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Extend abortion pledges to Northern Irish women, Labor encourages government



The & draconian & # 39; Abortion legislation in Northern Ireland needs to be changed to give women access to medication that ends, as in the rest of the UK, Labor said.

Shadow Northern Ireland Secretary Tony Lloyd called on the government to take action after it was announced that the rules in England will be changed to enable women to take the second abortion pill at home.

The move ensures that the country follows Scotland and Wales by giving women the opportunity to take the pill in the safe and familiar environment of their own homes.

Insists that the abortion law in Northern Ireland is intensified after a referendum in the Republic of Ireland earlier this year with strong support for liberalization legislation south of the border.

The government must take action and bring the draconian laws of Northern Ireland into line with those in the rest of the UK

But Northern Ireland has not had a meeting since last year and the British government has so far urged Stormont to change.

Mr. Lloyd said the announcement in England emphasized the "shocking reality that women in Northern Ireland do not have the same access to the health care they need as in the rest of the UK".

He added, "Access to safe and legal terminations in Northern Ireland is strictly limited, resulting in women traveling to Britain for termination or taking non-regulated pills purchased online.

"Women in Northern Ireland who take these pills endanger their lives.

"The UK government must take action and bring the draconian laws of Northern Ireland into line with those in the rest of the UK to ensure that women do not suffer any further suffering and that those in need receive the care they need."

According to the current system, women in England must take both pills, mifepristone and misoprostol 24-48 hours in a clinic to terminate an early pre-pregnancy pregnancy of 10 weeks.

The government said it will legalize home use before the end of the year in a move welcomed by campaigners who say that the current system can cause unnecessary stress and trauma.

Women leave the clinic after taking the second pill and give the pregnancy at home, with the two visits sometimes challenging to organize and often uncomfortable or traumatic – and some women even start to fail before they come home.

In July, more than 170 politicians from around the spectrum in the United Kingdom and Ireland called on the British government to reform Northern Irish abortion legislation.

The group, including Conservative, Labor and Lib Dem MPs and peers, members of the Stormont Assembly and Irish TD & # 39; s and Senators, said it was about protecting women's human rights and respecting Good Friday -agreement.

According to the group, nearly 1,000 women and girls had to travel to Britain in 2017 for safe terminations, while others had to take illegal abortion medications at home.


Source link

Extend abortion pledges to Northern Irish women, Labor encourages government



The & draconian & # 39; Abortion legislation in Northern Ireland needs to be changed to give women access to medication that ends, as in the rest of the UK, Labor said.

Shadow Northern Ireland Secretary Tony Lloyd called on the government to take action after it was announced that the rules in England will be changed to enable women to take the second abortion pill at home.

The move ensures that the country follows Scotland and Wales by giving women the opportunity to take the pill in the safe and familiar environment of their own homes.

Insists that the abortion law in Northern Ireland is intensified after a referendum in the Republic of Ireland earlier this year with strong support for liberalization legislation south of the border.

The government must take action and bring the draconian laws of Northern Ireland into line with those in the rest of the UK

But Northern Ireland has not had a meeting since last year and the British government has so far urged Stormont to change.

Mr. Lloyd said the announcement in England emphasized the "shocking reality that women in Northern Ireland do not have the same access to the health care they need as in the rest of the UK".

He added, "Access to safe and legal terminations in Northern Ireland is strictly limited, resulting in women traveling to Britain for termination or taking non-regulated pills purchased online.

"Women in Northern Ireland who take these pills endanger their lives.

"The UK government must take action and bring the draconian laws of Northern Ireland into line with those in the rest of the UK to ensure that women do not suffer any further suffering and that those in need receive the care they need."

According to the current system, women in England must take both pills, mifepristone and misoprostol 24-48 hours in a clinic to terminate an early pre-pregnancy pregnancy of 10 weeks.

The government said it will legalize home use before the end of the year in a move welcomed by campaigners who say that the current system can cause unnecessary stress and trauma.

Women leave the clinic after taking the second pill and give the pregnancy at home, with the two visits sometimes challenging to organize and often uncomfortable or traumatic – and some women even start to fail before they come home.

In July, more than 170 politicians from around the spectrum in the United Kingdom and Ireland called on the British government to reform Northern Irish abortion legislation.

The group, including Conservative, Labor and Lib Dem MPs and peers, members of the Stormont Assembly and Irish TD & # 39; s and Senators, said it was about protecting women's human rights and respecting Good Friday -agreement.

According to the group, nearly 1,000 women and girls had to travel to Britain in 2017 for safe terminations, while others had to take illegal abortion medications at home.


Source link

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