YES! This island in the Pacific limits fishing to help protect precious coral reef



It is estimated that coral reefs account for only 0.1 percent of the world's oceans, but they provide a home for more than 25 percent of all known marine species. These structures are in turn crucial for the survival of a significant number of aquatic animals.

The bad news is that these reefs are disappearing at an alarming rate as a result of climate change, overfishing, ocean pollution and other human-related threats. According to the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) about half of the shallow water coral reefs have already been lost, causing major problems for the many species living in the underwater ecosystems.

Because the fate of coral reefs has come to light in recent years, many places have stepped up their efforts to protect these delicate marine biomes. Earlier this summer, for example, Hawaii legislators have adopted a ban on sun brands that contain chemicals known to be coral and to disrupt aquatic ecosystems such as oxybenzone and octinoxate.

In a similar movement designed to protect coral reefs threatened by human activities, the Pacific Island Nation of New Caledonia recently announced increased protection measures for coral ecosystems off the coast. This is a groundbreaking step in saving the remaining coral reefs of our planet from extinction, and it will be helpful in helping the 9,300 marine species that thrive in and around the remote areas of the archipelago in the coming years.

As John Tanzer, the head of the oceans for WWF International, reportedly stated: "This is the kind of leadership we need to see when preserving coral reefs and we applaud it." He added: "With good management, these marine protected areas will help preserve fish populations and the health of the ecosystem that will increase the reef's resistance to the effects of climate change in the future."

In contrast to many of the planet's coral ecosystems, New Caledonia has managed to remain almost untouched up to now. In fact, the island's reefs, including Astrolabe, Chesterfield, Petrie, and Bellona, ​​are considered some of the healthiest corals left on earth, making it all the more important to protect these beautiful and ecologically essential structures.

So what specific efforts are the leaders of New Caledonia taking to do this? It is exciting that the government officials of the island are planning to designate areas around the reefs as "marine protected areas & # 39; (MPA & # 39; s). This means that both commercial and industrial fishing, along with other activities that could endanger marine life and their habitats, are prohibited in 28,000 square kilometers (10,810 square miles) of waters. Moreover, the tourist activity in and near reef ecosystems will from now on be strictly regulated.

Although this is certainly a big win in the battle to save coral reefs from damage and possible extinction, there is still a lot of work to be done. As Christophe Chevillon, head of the Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy in New Caledonia and a draftsman of the new measures, reportedly said: "Although we believe this is a major breakthrough, we are convinced that New Caledonia can go even further and can point the way for other Pacific countries. "

He continued: "In fact, the protected 28,000 square kilometers represent only 2 percent of the Coral Sea Natural Park." We certainly agree that the waters of New Caledonia are worth more than protection and we hope to hear about further conservation efforts in the near future!

Meanwhile, we can do a lot on a daily basis to help save our oceans and their dear residents. View the #EatForThePlanet campaign and these useful articles for more information on how to do your part:

Image source: Pixabay


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YES! This island in the Pacific limits fishing to help protect precious coral reef



It is estimated that coral reefs account for only 0.1 percent of the world's oceans, but they provide a home for more than 25 percent of all known marine species. These structures are in turn crucial for the survival of a significant number of aquatic animals.

The bad news is that these reefs are disappearing at an alarming rate as a result of climate change, overfishing, ocean pollution and other human-related threats. According to the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) about half of the shallow water coral reefs have already been lost, causing major problems for the many species living in the underwater ecosystems.

Because the fate of coral reefs has come to light in recent years, many places have stepped up their efforts to protect these delicate marine biomes. Earlier this summer, for example, Hawaii legislators have adopted a ban on sun brands that contain chemicals known to be coral and to disrupt aquatic ecosystems such as oxybenzone and octinoxate.

In a similar movement designed to protect coral reefs threatened by human activities, the Pacific Island Nation of New Caledonia recently announced increased protection measures for coral ecosystems off the coast. This is a groundbreaking step in saving the remaining coral reefs of our planet from extinction, and it will be helpful in helping the 9,300 marine species that thrive in and around the remote areas of the archipelago in the coming years.

As John Tanzer, the head of the oceans for WWF International, reportedly stated: "This is the kind of leadership we need to see when preserving coral reefs and we applaud it." He added: "With good management, these marine protected areas will help preserve fish populations and the health of the ecosystem that will increase the reef's resistance to the effects of climate change in the future."

In contrast to many of the planet's coral ecosystems, New Caledonia has managed to remain almost untouched up to now. In fact, the island's reefs, including Astrolabe, Chesterfield, Petrie, and Bellona, ​​are considered some of the healthiest corals left on earth, making it all the more important to protect these beautiful and ecologically essential structures.

So what specific efforts are the leaders of New Caledonia taking to do this? It is exciting that the government officials of the island are planning to designate areas around the reefs as "marine protected areas & # 39; (MPA & # 39; s). This means that both commercial and industrial fishing, along with other activities that could endanger marine life and their habitats, are prohibited in 28,000 square kilometers (10,810 square miles) of waters. Moreover, the tourist activity in and near reef ecosystems will from now on be strictly regulated.

Although this is certainly a big win in the battle to save coral reefs from damage and possible extinction, there is still a lot of work to be done. As Christophe Chevillon, head of the Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy in New Caledonia and a draftsman of the new measures, reportedly said: "Although we believe this is a major breakthrough, we are convinced that New Caledonia can go even further and can point the way for other Pacific countries. "

He continued: "In fact, the protected 28,000 square kilometers represent only 2 percent of the Coral Sea Natural Park." We certainly agree that the waters of New Caledonia are worth more than protection and we hope to hear about further conservation efforts in the near future!

Meanwhile, we can do a lot on a daily basis to help save our oceans and their dear residents. View the #EatForThePlanet campaign and these useful articles for more information on how to do your part:

Image source: Pixabay


Source link

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