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Medieval farmers in England lived on a solid diet of meat, vegetables and cheese



English farmers in the Middle Ages lived on a combination of meat stews, leafy vegetables and dairy products that scientists say were healthier than modern diets.

Food remains in 500-year-old pottery in the medieval town of West Cotton in Northamptonshire revealed the eating habits of normal people.

They would put on bread and so-called & # 39; white meat & # 39; have eaten – a term used by farmers, including butter and various types of cheese.

Poor people could not afford finer delicacies such as fish, but the presence of oats and barley proves that they had access to carbohydrates, probably in the form of bread.

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Cooking pots (photo) have analyzed their content using chemical and isotopic techniques to find evidence regarding the content of their diet

Cooking pots (photo) have analyzed their content using chemical and isotopic techniques to find evidence regarding the content of their diet

Analysis showed that normal people ate on stews made with mutton and beef, as well as leafy vegetables and dairy products while receiving carbohydrates from oats and barley (photo)

Analysis showed that normal people ate on stews made with mutton and beef, as well as leafy vegetables and dairy products while receiving carbohydrates from oats and barley (photo)

Cooking pots have analyzed their content using chemical and isotopic techniques to find evidence regarding the content of their diet.

Experts from the University of Bristol identified lipids, fats, oils and natural waxes from the ceramic.

They found that the farmers' surprisingly well-rounded diet had kept them well-fed and well-fed.

Dr. Julie Dunne from the University of Bristol told MailOnline: & # 39; The medieval farmer had a healthy diet and lacked nothing important!

& # 39; It is certainly much healthier than the food from processed foods that many of us eat today.

& # 39; Meat stews (beef and mutton) with leafy vegetables (cabbage, leek) would have supplied proteins and fiber and important vitamins and dairy products (butter and & # 39; green & # 39; cheeses) would also have proteins and other important nutrients have delivered.

& # 39; These dairy products were sometimes called the & # 39; white meat & # 39; of the poor and are known as one of the pillars of the medieval peasant diet.

& # 39; There was also a bakery on site and we also found plant remains of oats and barley – this would have yielded carbohydrates.

& # 39; The barley was probably used to add bread and oats to the stews to make them & # 39; pottage & # 39; and & # 39; bulk & # 39;. & # 39;

A series of historical documents and accounts was also examined for the study, which is published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Historical documents state that medieval farmers ate meat, fish, dairy products, fruit and vegetables.

But the researchers say that there was little direct evidence to support this prior to their studies.

Dr. Julie Dunne from the University of Bristol told MailOnline: & # 39; The medieval farmer had a healthy diet and lacked nothing important! & # 39; It is certainly much healthier than the food from processed foods that many of us eat today & # 39;

Dr. Julie Dunne from the University of Bristol told MailOnline: & # 39; The medieval farmer had a healthy diet and lacked nothing important! & # 39; It is certainly much healthier than the food from processed foods that many of us eat today & # 39;

Food scraps were found in 500-year-old pottery in the medieval town of West Cotton in Northamptonshire

Food scraps were found in 500-year-old pottery in the medieval town of West Cotton in Northamptonshire

The history books instead describe the lavish banquets of the elite and depict members of the royal family who hold dinners.

The lack of knowledge about what the majority of the population has survived is in stark contrast.

Dr. Dunne said: “Too often in history, the detail, for example food and clothing, of the everyday lives of ordinary people is unknown.

WHAT WERE PEOPLE IN MEDIEVAL TIMES?

The diet of people in England hundreds of years ago, during the Middle Ages, varied largely based on income.

The rich ate lavish meals of fish, board and other animals and wanted for very little.

The poor in the nation, however, were forced to adjust their lifestyle and live on British staples – including beef, mutton and vegetables.

Leeks and cabbage are often grown in England and are considered a big part of the farmer's diet.

Normal people also ate bread and so-called & # 39; white meat & # 39; – a term used by farmers, including cheese and butter.

& # 39; Traditionally we focus on the important historical figures because these are the people discussed in old documents.

& # 39; Much is known about the medieval dietary practices of the nobility and ecclesiastical institutions, but less about what food the medieval peasant has consumed. & # 39;

The researchers also looked at Western slaughterhouse techniques, methods for food preparation and waste disposal.

Historical documents state that medieval farmers ate meat, fish, dairy products, fruit and vegetables.

But the researchers say that there was little direct evidence to support this prior to their studies.

Dr. Dunne added: & # 39; Food and nutrition are central to understanding daily life in the medieval period, especially for the medieval farmer.

& # 39; This study has provided valuable information on diet and animal husbandry by medieval farmers and has illustrated agricultural production, consumption and economic life in one of the early medieval villages in England. & # 39;


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