How safe are e-cigarettes? Where is what science says? Health



The health ministry asked all states this week to ban electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other non-burning vaping devices because of the risks of public health and to ensure that they are not "sold, manufactured, distributed, traded, imported and advertised. The advice followed a week after the Delhi Supreme Court gave the Ministry seven days to submit an affidavit containing a timetable for regulatory measures to control the sale of e-cigarettes.

Are e-cigarettes safer than traditional cigarettes or are they paths to nicotine addiction? The debate remains highly polarized about whether e-cigarettes should be banned or not. His supporters say that the nicotine vapor in e-cigarettes is less harmful than conventional tobacco and helps stop smoking, while critics ask for a ban because of the potential for abuse as a gateway tool for nicotine addiction and smoking. There are indications that young users of e-cigarettes are at increased risk of starting to smoke and becoming long-term users of flammable tobacco products, according to the American Cancer Society's position statement on e-cigarettes issued in February 2018.

Although the jury has still encountered a ban, everyone supports strict regulations and a ban on vaping indoors because of the link with heart disease and the promotion of tumors across the board. Nicotine vapor also affects fetal growth and decreases brain development in children and adolescents, leading to learning and anxiety disorders.

What's in a vape?

The vapor (aerosol) contains various toxic substances that are harmful to human health, such as glycols, aldehydes, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). ), metals, silicate particles and other elements. The toxic substances are on average lower than in cigarette smoke, but heavy metals such as lead, chromium and nickel and chemicals such as formaldehyde are often more e-cigarettes than in traditional cigarettes, according to the World Health Organization's report on e-cigarettes. cigarettes. Some toxins are specific to e-cigarettes, such as glyoxal, which cause stomach irritation and kidney damage.

The levels of toxic substances vary greatly across and within brands and are sometimes higher than in tobacco smoke due to thermal dissolution of e-liquid ingredients and the difference is battery voltage and unitary circuits, which can change how the product heats the solution to become an aerosol.

Prohibition or regulation?

Because there is still no evidence for the effectiveness of e-cigarettes in helping smokers to completely stop nicotine addiction, scientists advise to be cautious. The British House of Commons Science and Technology Committee report on e-cigarettes released in August supports e-cigarettes as a tool to reduce harm and recommends their use on prescription for smoking cessation. Noting that they do not contain tar and carbon monoxide and that they are significantly less harmful by about 95% than conventional cigarettes, they also underline the need for regulation because "there are uncertainties, especially health effects in the long term, because the products do not have a history of long-term use ".

The American Cancer Society also warns that the health consequences of long-term use are not known and calls for closer monitoring and discouragement of the double use of e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes.

The latest evidence of e-cigarettes, according to The Lancet, warns: "e-cigarettes are big business, with tobacco manufacturers that have a large share in many of the products, it is naïve and premature … of the British House of Commons. ) Committee to confuse an absence of evidence with a lack of damage. & # 39;

On the basis of available scientific evidence, e-cigarettes should not be regulated as consumer products, but as an addictive drug that can only be prescribed to help users quit smoking. The trends in the sector show that the Indian e-cigarette market will grow with a compound annual growth of 34%, an increase from Rs 4.1 billion in 2017 to Rs 7.4 billion in 2019, according to GlobalData Plc, the regulator for Medicines ensure that it is only used as a damage limiting device to stop nicotine addiction.

To follow @htlifeandstyle for more

Published for the first time: Sep 02, 2018 09:51 IST


Source link

How safe are e-cigarettes? Where is what science says? Health



The health ministry asked all states this week to ban electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other non-burning vaping devices because of the risks of public health and to ensure that they are not "sold, manufactured, distributed, traded, imported and advertised. The advice followed a week after the Delhi Supreme Court gave the Ministry seven days to submit an affidavit containing a timetable for regulatory measures to control the sale of e-cigarettes.

Are e-cigarettes safer than traditional cigarettes or are they paths to nicotine addiction? The debate remains highly polarized about whether e-cigarettes should be banned or not. His supporters say that the nicotine vapor in e-cigarettes is less harmful than conventional tobacco and helps stop smoking, while critics ask for a ban because of the potential for abuse as a gateway tool for nicotine addiction and smoking. There are indications that young users of e-cigarettes are at increased risk of starting to smoke and becoming long-term users of flammable tobacco products, according to the American Cancer Society's position statement on e-cigarettes issued in February 2018.

Although the jury has still encountered a ban, everyone supports strict regulations and a ban on vaping indoors because of the link with heart disease and the promotion of tumors across the board. Nicotine vapor also affects fetal growth and decreases brain development in children and adolescents, leading to learning and anxiety disorders.

What's in a vape?

The vapor (aerosol) contains various toxic substances that are harmful to human health, such as glycols, aldehydes, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). ), metals, silicate particles and other elements. The toxic substances are on average lower than in cigarette smoke, but heavy metals such as lead, chromium and nickel and chemicals such as formaldehyde are often more e-cigarettes than in traditional cigarettes, according to the World Health Organization's report on e-cigarettes. cigarettes. Some toxins are specific to e-cigarettes, such as glyoxal, which cause stomach irritation and kidney damage.

The levels of toxic substances vary greatly across and within brands and are sometimes higher than in tobacco smoke due to thermal dissolution of e-liquid ingredients and the difference is battery voltage and unitary circuits, which can change how the product heats the solution to become an aerosol.

Prohibition or regulation?

Because there is still no evidence for the effectiveness of e-cigarettes in helping smokers to completely stop nicotine addiction, scientists advise to be cautious. The British House of Commons Science and Technology Committee report on e-cigarettes released in August supports e-cigarettes as a tool to reduce harm and recommends their use on prescription for smoking cessation. Noting that they do not contain tar and carbon monoxide and that they are significantly less harmful by about 95% than conventional cigarettes, they also underline the need for regulation because "there are uncertainties, especially health effects in the long term, because the products do not have a history of long-term use ".

The American Cancer Society also warns that the health consequences of long-term use are not known and calls for closer monitoring and discouragement of the double use of e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes.

The latest evidence of e-cigarettes, according to The Lancet, warns: "e-cigarettes are big business, with tobacco manufacturers that have a large share in many of the products, it is naïve and premature … of the British House of Commons. ) Committee to confuse an absence of evidence with a lack of damage. & # 39;

On the basis of available scientific evidence, e-cigarettes should not be regulated as consumer products, but as an addictive drug that can only be prescribed to help users quit smoking. The trends in the sector show that the Indian e-cigarette market will grow with a compound annual growth of 34%, an increase from Rs 4.1 billion in 2017 to Rs 7.4 billion in 2019, according to GlobalData Plc, the regulator for Medicines ensure that it is only used as a damage limiting device to stop nicotine addiction.

To follow @htlifeandstyle for more

Published for the first time: Sep 02, 2018 09:51 IST


Source link

How safe are e-cigarettes? Where is what science says? Health



The health ministry asked all states this week to ban electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other non-burning vaping devices because of the risks of public health and to ensure that they are not "sold, manufactured, distributed, traded, imported and advertised. The advice followed a week after the Delhi Supreme Court gave the Ministry seven days to submit an affidavit containing a timetable for regulatory measures to control the sale of e-cigarettes.

Are e-cigarettes safer than traditional cigarettes or are they paths to nicotine addiction? The debate remains highly polarized about whether e-cigarettes should be banned or not. His supporters say that the nicotine vapor in e-cigarettes is less harmful than conventional tobacco and helps stop smoking, while critics ask for a ban because of the potential for abuse as a gateway tool for nicotine addiction and smoking. There are indications that young users of e-cigarettes are at increased risk of starting to smoke and becoming long-term users of flammable tobacco products, according to the American Cancer Society's position statement on e-cigarettes issued in February 2018.

Although the jury has still encountered a ban, everyone supports strict regulations and a ban on vaping indoors because of the link with heart disease and the promotion of tumors across the board. Nicotine vapor also affects fetal growth and decreases brain development in children and adolescents, leading to learning and anxiety disorders.

What's in a vape?

The vapor (aerosol) contains various toxic substances that are harmful to human health, such as glycols, aldehydes, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). ), metals, silicate particles and other elements. The toxic substances are on average lower than in cigarette smoke, but heavy metals such as lead, chromium and nickel and chemicals such as formaldehyde are often more e-cigarettes than in traditional cigarettes, according to the World Health Organization's report on e-cigarettes. cigarettes. Some toxins are specific to e-cigarettes, such as glyoxal, which cause stomach irritation and kidney damage.

The levels of toxic substances vary greatly across and within brands and are sometimes higher than in tobacco smoke due to thermal dissolution of e-liquid ingredients and the difference is battery voltage and unitary circuits, which can change how the product heats the solution to become an aerosol.

Prohibition or regulation?

Because there is still no evidence for the effectiveness of e-cigarettes in helping smokers to completely stop nicotine addiction, scientists advise to be cautious. The British House of Commons Science and Technology Committee report on e-cigarettes released in August supports e-cigarettes as a tool to reduce harm and recommends their use on prescription for smoking cessation. Noting that they do not contain tar and carbon monoxide and that they are significantly less harmful by about 95% than conventional cigarettes, they also underline the need for regulation because "there are uncertainties, especially health effects in the long term, because the products do not have a history of long-term use ".

The American Cancer Society also warns that the health consequences of long-term use are not known and calls for closer monitoring and discouragement of the double use of e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes.

The latest evidence of e-cigarettes, according to The Lancet, warns: "e-cigarettes are big business, with tobacco manufacturers that have a large share in many of the products, it is naïve and premature … of the British House of Commons. ) Committee to confuse an absence of evidence with a lack of damage. & # 39;

On the basis of available scientific evidence, e-cigarettes should not be regulated as consumer products, but as an addictive drug that can only be prescribed to help users quit smoking. The trends in the sector show that the Indian e-cigarette market will grow with a compound annual growth of 34%, an increase from Rs 4.1 billion in 2017 to Rs 7.4 billion in 2019, according to GlobalData Plc, the regulator for Medicines ensure that it is only used as a damage limiting device to stop nicotine addiction.

To follow @htlifeandstyle for more

Published for the first time: Sep 02, 2018 09:51 IST


Source link

How safe are e-cigarettes? Where is what science says? Health



The health ministry asked all states this week to ban electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other non-burning vaping devices because of the risks of public health and to ensure that they are not "sold, manufactured, distributed, traded, imported and advertised. The advice followed a week after the Delhi Supreme Court gave the Ministry seven days to submit an affidavit containing a timetable for regulatory measures to control the sale of e-cigarettes.

Are e-cigarettes safer than traditional cigarettes or are they paths to nicotine addiction? The debate remains highly polarized about whether e-cigarettes should be banned or not. His supporters say that the nicotine vapor in e-cigarettes is less harmful than conventional tobacco and helps stop smoking, while critics ask for a ban because of the potential for abuse as a gateway tool for nicotine addiction and smoking. There are indications that young users of e-cigarettes are at increased risk of starting to smoke and becoming long-term users of flammable tobacco products, according to the American Cancer Society's position statement on e-cigarettes issued in February 2018.

Although the jury has still encountered a ban, everyone supports strict regulations and a ban on vaping indoors because of the link with heart disease and the promotion of tumors across the board. Nicotine vapor also affects fetal growth and decreases brain development in children and adolescents, leading to learning and anxiety disorders.

What's in a vape?

The vapor (aerosol) contains various toxic substances that are harmful to human health, such as glycols, aldehydes, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). ), metals, silicate particles and other elements. The toxic substances are on average lower than in cigarette smoke, but heavy metals such as lead, chromium and nickel and chemicals such as formaldehyde are often more e-cigarettes than in traditional cigarettes, according to the World Health Organization's report on e-cigarettes. cigarettes. Some toxins are specific to e-cigarettes, such as glyoxal, which cause stomach irritation and kidney damage.

The levels of toxic substances vary greatly across and within brands and are sometimes higher than in tobacco smoke due to thermal dissolution of e-liquid ingredients and the difference is battery voltage and unitary circuits, which can change how the product heats the solution to become an aerosol.

Prohibition or regulation?

Because there is still no evidence for the effectiveness of e-cigarettes in helping smokers to completely stop nicotine addiction, scientists advise to be cautious. The British House of Commons Science and Technology Committee report on e-cigarettes released in August supports e-cigarettes as a tool to reduce harm and recommends their use on prescription for smoking cessation. Noting that they do not contain tar and carbon monoxide and that they are significantly less harmful by about 95% than conventional cigarettes, they also underline the need for regulation because "there are uncertainties, especially health effects in the long term, because the products do not have a history of long-term use ".

The American Cancer Society also warns that the health consequences of long-term use are not known and calls for closer monitoring and discouragement of the double use of e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes.

The latest evidence of e-cigarettes, according to The Lancet, warns: "e-cigarettes are big business, with tobacco manufacturers that have a large share in many of the products, it is naïve and premature … of the British House of Commons. ) Committee to confuse an absence of evidence with a lack of damage. & # 39;

On the basis of available scientific evidence, e-cigarettes should not be regulated as consumer products, but as an addictive drug that can only be prescribed to help users quit smoking. The trends in the sector show that the Indian e-cigarette market will grow with a compound annual growth of 34%, an increase from Rs 4.1 billion in 2017 to Rs 7.4 billion in 2019, according to GlobalData Plc, the regulator for Medicines ensure that it is only used as a damage limiting device to stop nicotine addiction.

To follow @htlifeandstyle for more

Published for the first time: Sep 02, 2018 09:51 IST


Source link

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