Municipality fights against typhus



The Herald

Munyaradzi Musiiwa Midlands Correspondent
The GWERU City Council has stepped up the fight against typhus, claiming nine lives in the last three weeks, by training more than 1,500 people by training schools, colleges and health professionals at Midlands State University (MSU) to become proactive. and to deal with suspected individuals.

Gweru municipal secretary Mrs Elizabeth Gwatipedza said that schools and institutions for higher and tertiary education would soon open again, so there was a need for authorities at those respective institutions to be proactive.

Ms. Gwatipedza said that the training exercise at MSU has started to inform health care workers at the institution how to deal with suspicious cases of typhus.

"After the outbreak of typhus in Gweru, we decided to start train schools and higher and tertiary education institutions so that they are proactive and prevent the spread of the disease," she said.

"The training has already started on MSU because they will be opened soon.

"MSU has concentrated about 23 000 students in an area, so because of the interactivity of students at educational institutions, there is a high risk of spreading typhus.

"We want them to prevent the spread of the disease and to tackle suspicious cases.

"Our health director, Mr. Sam Sekenhamo, is responsible for the training."

Mrs Gwatipedza said that the Task Force of the Ministry of Health and Childcare has succeeded in withholding typhus and that no new cases have been reported.

"We are happy to have treated 17 cases yesterday," she said.

"These are not new cases, but these are people who have just been admitted.

"The Task Force has managed to contain the situation and our hope is that we would very quickly have eradicated the disease.

"We suspect that the water was contaminated at the household level, because we traced our pipes and we did not see any cross-contamination of sewer baths in clean water pipes."


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Municipality fights against typhus



The Herald

Munyaradzi Musiiwa Midlands Correspondent
The GWERU City Council has stepped up the fight against typhus, claiming nine lives in the last three weeks, by training more than 1,500 people by training schools, colleges and health professionals at Midlands State University (MSU) to become proactive. and to deal with suspected individuals.

Gweru municipal secretary Mrs Elizabeth Gwatipedza said that schools and institutions for higher and tertiary education would soon open again, so there was a need for authorities at those respective institutions to be proactive.

Ms. Gwatipedza said that the training exercise at MSU has started to inform health care workers at the institution how to deal with suspicious cases of typhus.

"After the outbreak of typhus in Gweru, we decided to start train schools and higher and tertiary education institutions so that they are proactive and prevent the spread of the disease," she said.

"The training has already started on MSU because they will be opened soon.

"MSU has concentrated about 23 000 students in an area, so because of the interactivity of students at educational institutions, there is a high risk of spreading typhus.

"We want them to prevent the spread of the disease and to tackle suspicious cases.

"Our health director, Mr. Sam Sekenhamo, is responsible for the training."

Mrs Gwatipedza said that the Task Force of the Ministry of Health and Childcare has succeeded in withholding typhus and that no new cases have been reported.

"We are happy to have treated 17 cases yesterday," she said.

"These are not new cases, but these are people who have just been admitted.

"The Task Force has managed to contain the situation and our hope is that we would very quickly have eradicated the disease.

"We suspect that the water was contaminated at the household level, because we traced our pipes and we did not see any cross-contamination of sewer baths in clean water pipes."


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